1964 Alfa Romeo TZ Coupe

It’s tempting to speculate what this car might have brought if it had retired after the 1964 season instead of being raced for years

One of the most desirable of all of the postwar Alfas, TZs were—and continue to be—considered as Alfa Romeo’s version of Ferrari’s GTO. Ranking in rarity with the very best sports cars, only about 112 were built between 1963 and 1967. TZs raced in the most important races, were driven by some of the best drivers at the time and competed against the likes of Ferrari 250 GTOs, Shelby Cobras, and Porsche 904s.

According to research, as well as the Zagato TZ Registry, chassis 750006 was completed and raceprepared by Autodelta for the Alfa Romeo DIPRE ESPE (Experimental Department). This was to be one of the few Autodelta-prepared TZ chassis that were built. The later competition cars were derived from the standard homologation cars and are therefore not as rare or desirable. As such, chassis 750006 was fitted with special outboard front shock mounts, a close-ratio gearbox and a larger radiator header tank.

Barely three weeks after acquisition on April 24, 1964, 750006 was assigned race number 58 in preparation for entry into the Targa Florio. While the historic Targa Florio archives are not accessible, there is photographic evidence that corroborates the car and driver’s participation in the various stages of the race. In June 1964, chassis 750006 contested the Le Mans 24 Hour race, where it battled against a squadron of Porsche 904s, Ferrari 250 GTOs and Shelby Cobras. Although the car faced a horsepower disadvantage, 750006, with Giampiero Biscaldi and Giancarlo Sala driving, managed 15th overall and 10th in GT.

In March 1965, Giancarlo Sala bought the car. Sala continued to race 750006 in Italy during 1966, 1967 and 1968, finally entering the 1969 Targa Florio that May, where it failed to finish. In an effort to remain competitive through weight reduction, Sala removed all paint from the inner and outer bodywork of 750006 at some point in 1967. Sala retained the TZ for another 13 years, finally selling it in June 1982. Restoration work was eventually begun. Due to the condition of the bare aluminum body, much of the skin had to be replaced. The roof and most inner components of the body, however, remain original, and it should be noted that the original aluminum skin of the body will be included with the sale of the car.

In order to definitively confirm the car’s authenticity and identity, 750006 was taken to Italy in February 2011 and submitted to the rigorous scrutiny of a homologation and authentication session at the factory-supported Registro Italiano Alfa Romeo. The current owners have applied for, and have been granted, the most elaborate certification, the “Certificazione di Autenticita.”

Thor Thorson

Thor Thorson - SCM Contributing Editor

Thor grew up in northern Iowa. His father bought a red Jag XK 150 in the late 1950s, and that was all it took; he has been in love with sports cars , racing cars and the associated adrenaline rush ever since. He has vintage raced for more than 20 years, the bulk of them spent behind the wheel of a blue Elva 7. When he’s not racing, he is president of Vintage Racing Motors Inc., a collector-car dealer and vintage-racing support company based in Redmond, WA. His knowledge runs the full spectrum of vintage racing, and he has put that expertise to good use for SCM since 2003.

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