1976/77 Broadspeed Jaguar XJ12 Saloon

Going, turning, sticking, and stopping were evident and well in hand, but keeping the Jaguar in one piece proved to be more difficult than anticipated

R alph Broad’s racing team had excelled in touring car competition since the early 1960s, running Ford Anglias, Mini Coopers, and Triumph Dolomites.

Leyland subsequently contracted his Broadspeed team to prepare a Group 2 Jaguar XJ12 to confront BMW and Ford in the European Touring Car Championship. A heroic development period from October 1975 saw two cars built for the 1976 racing program, of which this is the second, chassis number BELJC002.

Principal racing modifications to the robustly-built Jaguar coupe included provision of massive AP brakes cooled by special ducts at all four corners and specially cast suspension components to cope with racing loads. The interior, while stripped and now featuring just one bucket seat, actually retained its walnut veneer dash and electric windows, possibly unique features for a racing car. There was no doubting “the Big Cat’s” unrivaled power, with its tuned 5.4-liter V12 engine developing some 560 hp. The car’s extrovert character was amplified by its gigantic 19-inch wheels hooded beneath bulging arches, a low front splitter, and its large bootlid spoiler.

The Broadspeed Jaguar XJ12 Saloon offered here is number two of four built by Broadspeed from 1976 to 1977. Upon Broadspeed’s closure, it was rebuilt by Bob Kerr and features uprated 1977-specification suspension. It formed part of Jaguar enthusiast Allen Lloyd’s private collection before being acquired by its current owner. It has run no fewer than three times in the Goodwood Festival of Speed and is also eligible for the recently created race series for 1970s/80s touring cars.

Thor Thorson

Thor Thorson - SCM Contributing Editor

Thor grew up in northern Iowa. His father bought a red Jag XK 150 in the late 1950s, and that was all it took; he has been in love with sports cars , racing cars and the associated adrenaline rush ever since. He has vintage raced for more than 20 years, the bulk of them spent behind the wheel of a blue Elva 7. When he’s not racing, he is president of Vintage Racing Motors Inc., a collector-car dealer and vintage-racing support company based in Redmond, WA. His knowledge runs the full spectrum of vintage racing, and he has put that expertise to good use for SCM since 2003.

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