They’re Not Real, But They’re Real Fun

Ask any classic car enthusiast to name the 10 most significant vintage race cars of all time, and I’d wager that the Jaguar C-type or D-type — or maybe both — would appear on the list. It’s no accident that the XK-SS — the street-variant of the D-type — is one of the finalists in the most recent Sports Car Market March Madness poll.
The two racing versions made their mark in the most important Read More

1959 MGA 1500

MGAs may be starting to catch up with Austin-Healey values, and this might be a good time to buy

Chassis number: HDA4361077

The MGA was produced by the MG division of the British Motor Corporation from 1955 to 1962. The MGA replaced the older T-type cars and represented a complete styling break from the older vehicles. The car was officially launched at the Frankfurt Motor Show in 1955.
This car, “670 YUC,” has a B.M.I.H.T. certificate showing that it was Read More

1955 Austin-Healey 100S

These cars were almost lost in the limelight of the Jaguars, Aston-Martins, Mercedes-Benzes, and Ferraris that raced in the same grids

Not long after the stunning Austin-Healey 100 debuted, Donald Healey began planning a high-performance version of his well-received sports car. Knowing that a competitive racing variant would boost the image of the various production models, several special test cars were created in 1953 and 1954 with various motorsport applications in mind.

After Read More

1959 Austin-Healey 100-6 Jamaican

In light of its popularity, and taking into consideration the potential of its rigid and low-frame chassis, the 4-cylinder Austin-Healey gave way in 1956 to the first 6-cylinder version, the 100-6, which boasted a BMC C-Series engine with a cubic capacity of close to 2.7 liters.

The success of the Austin-Healeys across the Atlantic was such that most of the cars produced between 1953 and 1968 were sold in the United States—mainly in California, where the climate was conducive Read More

1949 Jaguar XK120 Alloy Roadster

The few alloy-bodied cars were essentially prototypes sold to raise desperately needed foreign currency for the factory design team


During the difficult period after World War II, Jaguar Cars became the United Kingdom’s biggest U.S.-dollar earner, thanks in no small measure to the success of its XK120 sports car. Ironically, the XK120’s creation had only come about because delays in developing the Mk VII saloon had forced William Read More

1957 Austin-Healey 100-6 BN4 2+2 Barn Find

Introduced for 1956, the 100-6 represented the most radical step forward in the “Big Healey” sports car development. Despite its initial success, sales of the original Austin-Healey 100 had begun to decline by the mid-1950s, so the model was revamped as the 100-6, BMC’s 2.6-liter C-series six-cylinder engine replacing the original four-cylinder Austin Atlantic unit. At the same time, the wheelbase was lengthened from 7ft 6in to 7ft 8in, which enabled the inclusion of two occasional seats in the rear Read More

Ex-Donald Healey 1961 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk II

Graham Robson remembers the car in BMC’s U.K. press fleet, but there’s no mention of Donald Healey having a Mk II as “a personal car”

Introduced in 1961, the Mk II version of Austin-Healey’s highly successful 3000 model was visually distinguished by its vertical radiator grille bars and revised front air intake.

Sharing the same basic chassis design as its predecessor-independent front suspension, live rear axle, and disc/drum brakes-it enjoyed superior Read More

Bugeye Sprite: 50 and Counting

Healey 100 designer Gerry Coker came up with “a working man’s Ferrari,” which could be kept in a bike shed, and used standard parts from BMC sedans

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Question: What collectible automobile copied the chassis design of the Jaguar D-type, was introduced at the Monte Carlo Grand Prix, took first, second, and third at Sebring during its first year of production, and yet was intended “for a chap to park in Read More

Everyman Goes Racing

With Ferraris, Porsches, and Alfas around me as the flag dropped, I was living the dream I’d had as far back as I can remember

If you walked the paddock at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca during the 35th Annual Monterey Rolex Historic Automobile Races on August 16-17, you might have thought vintage racing was entirely the province of wealthy enthusiasts-especially the three featured classes.

On your left you would have seen Read More

Triumphs of the Will

As Triumph TR prices lag behind Austin-Healeys, determined, well-advised collectors can find bargains

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The big news in British cars over the past ten years has been the rapid rise in prices for Austin-Healeys-from $25,000 to $75,000 for very nice cars, with a few magnificent ones bringing $100,000 plus.

By contrast, Triumphs-which offer much the same highway performance and creature comforts-couldn’t break out of the $7,500 to $15,000 range. Until Read More