1914 American Underslung Model 644 Touring

The innovative American Motors Company of Indianapolis, IN, is best remembered for their famous “Underslung” models. These striking designs placed the frame rails below the axles, giving a significantly reduced center of gravity along with a sporting profile. Significantly oversized wheels remedied the problem of ground clearance. This design innovation resulted in a chassis with remarkably sure handling while still retaining the necessary clearances to handle the poor road conditions of the day.

The effect of the underslung chassis, with Read More

1958 Chevrolet Cameo NAPCO 4×4

This 1958 Chevrolet Apache Cameo Carrier is the rarest of the Cameos, and it was the last year it was produced. Just 1,405 were made for 1958, and only a few were fitted with the NAPCO 4×4 system. This Cameo was treated to an exhaustive, no-expense-spared, frame-off restoration to the most exacting standards. The truck has been driven only five miles since the restoration was completed. This is its first time offered for public sale at auction. It is a Read More

1945 GMC DUKW 2.5-Ton Amphibian

Initially, the DUKW was rejected by the U.S. Army, but the unexpected rescue of a ship that had run aground convinced them of its efficiency and seaworthiness, subsequently confirmed by a channel crossing. Developed by Sparkman & Stephens in collaboration with General Motors Corporation, each letter of its name has a meaning: “D” for a vehicle designed in 1942; “U” for utility; “K” for front-wheel drive: “W” for two rear axles. Understandably, it was known colloquially as the “Duck.” Derived Read More

1950 Nash-Healey Roadster

What emerged from this two-year restoration process is nothing short of remarkable — Donald Healey’s own Nash-Healey, exactly as he built it, with no expense spared to ensure 100% historical accuracy. Restored by Tsikuris Classics — under the supervision by noted authority Bill Emerson. All major components are original to this car. With ownership history that begins with Donald Healey himself, there is no collection in the world, no matter how grand, that this car will not enhance.

1954 Chrysler GS-1 Special by Ghia

During the 1950s, Italian coachbuilder Ghia built numerous one-off “dream cars” for Chrysler Corporation. One, the slab-sided and extremely modern “Thomas Special,” named for Chrysler export executive C.B. Thomas, was so well received at European shows that a limited run of duplicates was produced for European customers. Others soon followed, including the so-called Ghia Special.

Chrysler’s Export Division had two 1954 Chrysler New Yorker Deluxe chassis, each with a 125.5-inch wheelbase frame, a 235-horsepower Hemi V8, and a PowerFlite automatic Read More

1935 Duesenberg Model SJ Convertible Coupe

As advanced as the Model J Duesenberg was upon its introduction in 1929, most of the technical advancements contained within were confined to the body and chassis. The design of the front end and fenders — as well as that of most coachbuilt bodies — still bowed toward late-1920s convention, albeit stylishly. As a result, by the mid-1930s, the Duesenberg still held mechanical prowess over virtually everything else on the road. From a design standpoint, however, it was looking rather Read More

1966 Shelby Cobra 427 Roadster

Every Shelby 427 Cobra is rare simply by nature, but some reach the level of “exceptional” — a fact Carroll Shelby acknowledged when he signed the glovebox door of CSX3301 with the inscription: “One of the rarest CSX3301 Carroll Shelby.”

This Cobra was completed at AC Cars for delivery directly to Ford Advanced vehicles in Slough, England. As such, it was never invoiced to Shelby American. Factory equipped with Smiths gauges, a hard top, 427 engine and Sunburst wheels, it Read More

1955 Hudson Italia

Hudson designer Frank Spring (who left Murphy Coachbuilders in the 1930s to join Hudson) contracted with Carrozzeria Touring of Milan to build 25 production models of his dream sports car.

Touring created a Superleggera coupe with an aluminum unibody built over a steel tub frame. Unique to the Italia were aircraft-style doors, custom bucket seats, Borrani knockoff wheels, air ducts in the body for brake cooling, and triple exhaust pipes that served as stop, brake and backup lights. Each car Read More

1958 Chrysler 300D Convertible

For much of its history, Chrysler was a frontrunner in building some of the most interesting and exciting high-performance cars Detroit had to offer. Foremost among them are the formidable early Hemi-powered Chrysler 300 “letter cars” of the 1950s, which, by virtue of their cost and long list of standard and optional features, were reserved for the wealthiest and most discerning buyers.

Cloaked in handsome Virgil Exner-designed bodies and carefully engineered, the 300 series offered the ultimate in American luxury Read More

1903 Ford Model A Rear Entry Tonneau

The first Ford Motor Company product was called, not surprisingly, the Model A. It was powered by an opposed 2-cylinder engine that displaced 100 cubic inches and developed 8 horsepower. Built on a wheelbase of only 72 inches, it weighed roughly 1,250 pounds, depending upon the body fitted. Its light weight made the most of the engine’s 8 horsepower, and an ordinary man could cover more ground in a day with a Model A Ford than with a horse and Read More

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