1952 Cunningham C-3 Coupe

Mathieu Heurtault, courtesy of Gooding & Company

Cunningham C-3s have picked up a bit of a tail wind recently, as seen during the Gooding sale at Pebble Beach in 2012, where a yellow coupe sold for $341,000 with commissions.

Our subject car, a 1952 Cunningham C-3 Vignale coupe, s/n 5210, sold at Gooding & Company’s Scottsdale auction on January 17, 2014, for $550,000, including buyer’s commission.

This tidy appreciation perhaps reflects the car’s role as one alternative to increasingly unaffordable top line collectibles: Ferrari, Mercedes, Porsche and Read More

1935 Auburn 851 Boattail Speedster

Pawel Litwinski, courtesy of Bonhams

In 1949, this exceptional Auburn Boattail Speedster was discovered in an old garage in Omaha, NE. The Auburn required some refurbishing, so a restoration was undertaken in 1951, and it was decided to restore the car as a 1936 852, perhaps in an attempt to make the already rare Speedster seem even more desirable, as 852s are extremely scarce. The Auburn was parked in the garage during the summer of 1962, and didn’t move from that spot for 52 years, Read More

1964 Chevrolet CERV II

Michael Furman ©2013, courtesy of RM Auctions

The brainchild of Zora Arkus-Duntov, the “Father of the Corvette,” the Chevrolet Engineering Research Vehicle II is the first known operating example of torque-vectoring all-wheel drive, and it is among the most important Corvette development vehicles in private hands today. Since leaving General Motors, it has only been owned by the Briggs Cunningham Museum, Miles Collier, John Moores and the consigning owner.

The first CERV was completed in 1960, and it was aimed at open-wheel racing. Duntov began work on Read More

1912 Stutz Model A Bear Cat

Michael Furman ©2013, courtesy of RM Auctions

By any standard, Harry C. Stutz was an unlikely artist. Perhaps a few in the stands at Indianapolis in 1911 saw Stutz’s creation coming, but they were in the minority, as they were engineers and fellow veterans of the early automobile industry, and they knew Stutz’s genius. The car that he built under his own name averaged 62.375 mph for 500 miles in that first running of the Indianapolis 500, running with only minimal mechanical adjustment and 13 pit stops, Read More

1966 Shelby GT350 H Fastback

This Shelby GT350 H underwent a complete frame-on restoration and has the original body paint. Over $150,000 was invested in this car. Shelby produced 1,003 of these cars. Today, the GT350 H has taken its place among the most sought-after Shelbys of all time, and with only 1,001 being built, they’re considerably rarer than the standard GT350. Concours-caliber restoration and incredible performance.

1954 Kaiser-Darrin Roadster

There have been many great automobile designers who have left their mark on the motoring landscape. Among these greats would have to be the contributions of Howard “Dutch” Darrin, whose design talent was favored among many of Hollywood’s elite. Quite simply, if you were famous and you wanted a car with a bit more flair, Howard Darrin was the man to see.

Toward the end of his career, Darrin formed an alliance with Kaiser-Frazer, and it was a contentious relationship Read More

1914 American Underslung Model 644 Touring

The innovative American Motors Company of Indianapolis, IN, is best remembered for their famous “Underslung” models. These striking designs placed the frame rails below the axles, giving a significantly reduced center of gravity along with a sporting profile. Significantly oversized wheels remedied the problem of ground clearance. This design innovation resulted in a chassis with remarkably sure handling while still retaining the necessary clearances to handle the poor road conditions of the day.

The effect of the underslung chassis, with Read More

1958 Chevrolet Cameo NAPCO 4×4

This 1958 Chevrolet Apache Cameo Carrier is the rarest of the Cameos, and it was the last year it was produced. Just 1,405 were made for 1958, and only a few were fitted with the NAPCO 4×4 system. This Cameo was treated to an exhaustive, no-expense-spared, frame-off restoration to the most exacting standards. The truck has been driven only five miles since the restoration was completed. This is its first time offered for public sale at auction. It is a Read More

1945 GMC DUKW 2.5-Ton Amphibian

Initially, the DUKW was rejected by the U.S. Army, but the unexpected rescue of a ship that had run aground convinced them of its efficiency and seaworthiness, subsequently confirmed by a channel crossing. Developed by Sparkman & Stephens in collaboration with General Motors Corporation, each letter of its name has a meaning: “D” for a vehicle designed in 1942; “U” for utility; “K” for front-wheel drive: “W” for two rear axles. Understandably, it was known colloquially as the “Duck.” Derived Read More

1950 Nash-Healey Roadster

What emerged from this two-year restoration process is nothing short of remarkable — Donald Healey’s own Nash-Healey, exactly as he built it, with no expense spared to ensure 100% historical accuracy. Restored by Tsikuris Classics — under the supervision by noted authority Bill Emerson. All major components are original to this car. With ownership history that begins with Donald Healey himself, there is no collection in the world, no matter how grand, that this car will not enhance.