1955 Jaguar XK 140 SE Coupe

In October 1954, the Jaguar XK 120’s replacement was launched and given the name XK 140. The new car offered more interior space — a result of the engine being moved forward three inches — and more precise rack-and-pinion steering was fitted.

The fixed-head coupe iteration offered 2+2 seating. The standard engine produced 190 horsepower, whilst the Special Equipment (SE) version, with the C-type head, produced 210 horsepower and had a top speed in excess of 135 mph.

The XK Read More

1952 Allard J2X

Exciting and engaging to drive, with features meant for performance over style, the Allard J2X successfully straddles the worlds of hot rods and sports cars. Truly a roadster intended for spirited driving, whether on the track or the street, the fun is in mastering its handling and its growling beast of an engine.

With the 1949 introduction of the J2 — a car designed to be successful in competition and to break into the all-important American market — Allard became Read More

1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato

“Driving a 250 SWB is like wielding a hammer; it commands your respect through aggression and raw power. The Zagato, however, feels more like a tailored suit. It’s agile, sophisticated, and equally responsive… it’s a truly beautiful car to drive. And it fits perfectly.” — Peter Read

After restoration, chassis 0186R hit the concours circuit, where it immediately accrued an enviable record of accolades. On its very first outing at the Louis Vuitton Concours at the Hurlingham Club in June Read More

1935 Aston Martin Ulster 2/4 Seater Tourer

Manufactured by Robert Bamford and Lionel Martin, the first Aston-Martins (the hyphen is correct for the period) rapidly established a reputation for high performance and sporting prowess in the years immediately following World War I.

The foundations were laid for proper series production with the formation of Aston Martin Motors Ltd. in 1926 under the stewardship of Augustus “Bert” Bertelli and William Renwick. Bertelli understood the effect of competition success on sales and sanctioned the construction of two Works racers Read More

1974 Lotus Europa Twin Cam Special

This is a two-owner car originally from Laguna Beach, CA. The restoration was completed by David Zumstein. It is said that he has restored many concours-winning English cars. The engine was rebuilt with higher-performance cams, pistons and valve-train components to give the car a little more power for the driver to enjoy. This has a one-piece Weber aluminum cylinder head with twin Weber carburetors and its original Renault 5-speed manual transmission with new bushings in the linkage. The woodgrain on Read More

1968 Triumph TR5 Roadster

Similar to the preceding TR4A — the first TR with independent rear suspension — but with Triumph’s 2.5-liter, 6-cylinder engine installed in place of the old 2.1-liter four, the TR5 was produced during the 1968 model year only (October 1967 to November 1968) pending the arrival of the restyled TR6.

The bulk of production was built in TR250 export trim, with twin Stromberg carburetors to meet U.S. emissions requirements and a reduced power output of 105 hp. U.K. models came Read More

1927 Bentley 6½ Litre Le Mans Sports

As with all great W.O. Bentley-era cars, the legendary 6½ Litre owes its existence to the original 3-liter design. Racing success, including the 1924 and 1927 Le Mans wins, quickly drove sales, with buyers soon demanding ever-more luxurious and heavy custom coachwork, resulting in the more powerful 4½ Litre, which in modified form earned Bentley’s third Le Mans win in 1928. While Tim Birkin famously created the supercharged 4½ Litre Blower Bentley, the Works’ own uprated 6½ Litre Speed Six Read More

1974 Jensen Interceptor Series III Sports Saloon

With the Interceptor saloon’s introduction in 1967, Jensen had switched from glassfibre to steel for its car bodies. Underneath, the preceding C-V8’s robust chassis, running gear and 6,276-cc Chrysler engine remained substantially unchanged. With around 280 bhp on tap, performance was more than adequate, The Motor recording a top speed of 140 mph with 100 mph arriving in 19 seconds. Four-wheel, servo-assisted Dunlop discs looked after the braking, while ride quality could be varied by the Armstrong Selectaride dampers’ dashboard Read More

1938 Jaguar SS 100 2½-Liter Roadster

Launched in 1936 alongside the 2½-liter saloon, the SS 100 Jaguar sports car marked the company’s first use of the Jaguar name. Beautifully styled in the manner of its SS 90 predecessor, the newcomer employed a shorter, 102-inch wheelbase chassis and a revised version of the 2,663-cc Standard Six which produced 104 bhp. In 1938, a 3½-liter version producing 125 bhp was added to the range, making the SS 100 a genuine 100-mph car.

Although a fine touring car, the Read More

1969 Aston Martin DB6 Mk I Vantage Sports Saloon

The culmination of Aston Martin’s long-running line of DB 6-cylinder sports saloons and thus considered by many to be the last real Aston, the DB6 had been introduced in 1965, updating the DB5.

Although recognizably related to the Touring-styled DB4 of 1958, the DB6 abandoned the Carrozzeria Touring-developed Superleggera body structure of its predecessors in favour of a conventional steel fabrication while retaining the aluminum outer panels.

Increased rear-seat space was the prime DB6 objective, so the wheelbase was now Read More

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