1938 Jaguar SS 100 2½-Liter Roadster

Launched in 1936 alongside the 2½-liter saloon, the SS 100 Jaguar sports car marked the company’s first use of the Jaguar name. Beautifully styled in the manner of its SS 90 predecessor, the newcomer employed a shorter, 102-inch wheelbase chassis and a revised version of the 2,663-cc Standard Six which produced 104 bhp. In 1938, a 3½-liter version producing 125 bhp was added to the range, making the SS 100 a genuine 100-mph car.

Although a fine touring car, the Read More

1969 Aston Martin DB6 Mk I Vantage Sports Saloon

The culmination of Aston Martin’s long-running line of DB 6-cylinder sports saloons and thus considered by many to be the last real Aston, the DB6 had been introduced in 1965, updating the DB5.

Although recognizably related to the Touring-styled DB4 of 1958, the DB6 abandoned the Carrozzeria Touring-developed Superleggera body structure of its predecessors in favour of a conventional steel fabrication while retaining the aluminum outer panels.

Increased rear-seat space was the prime DB6 objective, so the wheelbase was now Read More

1959 Jaguar XK 150S 3.4 Roadster

The final glorious incarnation of Jaguar’s fabulous XK series of sports cars arrived in 1957. The XK 150 was a progressive development of the XK 120 and XK 140, retaining the same basic chassis, 3.4-liter engine and 4-speed Moss transmission of its predecessors while benefiting from a new, wider body that provided increased interior space and improved visibility — courtesy of a single-piece wrap-around windscreen that replaced the XK 140’s divided screen.

Cleverly, the new body used many XK 120/140 Read More

1992 Jaguar XJ 220

The XJ 220 prototype was unveiled to the world in Birmingham in 1988. The car was greeted with enthusiasm, and the decision was taken to produce a limited series of 350 examples. As Jaguar was not set up to produce such a small series, the build project was given to Jaguar-Sport, a joint venture between Jaguar Car Ltd and TWR (Tom Walkinshaw Racing).

The heavy 12-cylinder setup gave way to a derivation of the lighter and less bulky V6 racing Read More

1965 Jaguar XKE Series I 4.2 convertible

From its electrifying March 1961 Geneva launch, Jaguar’s E-type redefined the term “sports car” at one stroke. Careful development brought improved comfort, and during 1964, the DOHC “XK” engine was enlarged to 4.2 liters and matched to a full-synchromesh gearbox for heightened drivability. Iconic styling cues including beautifully covered headlamps were retained, making these late-Series I E-types enduring objects of desire today.

This outstanding four-owner, late-Series I roadster is an original left-hand-drive Personal Export Delivery example sold new to a Read More

1965 Sunbeam Tiger Mk I Coupe

This car is equipped with a 164-hp, 260-ci, OHV V8 engine with a 4-barrel carburetor, 4-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs, live axle rear suspension with semi-elliptic leaf springs, and front-disc and rear-drum hydraulic brakes.

British coachbuilders Thomas Harrington Ltd. built only a handful of beautifully crafted fastback Le Mans coupe bodies for Sunbeam Alpine chassis during the early 1960s. Exactly one of those bodies was built for the Sunbeam Tiger, the potent Ford V8-powered “pocket rocket” Read More

1955 Austin-Healey 100S Sports Racing Two Seater

During the 1950s, the most accessible, most appealing, and in many cases, the most successful club racing car available to any aspiring racing driver was one of the products of the Donald Healey Motor Company’s famous factory at The Cape, Warwick.

This particularly appealing, and in period highly successful, Austin-Healey 100S is a shining example of the type. It has an outstanding record as one of the most successful 100S cars of its period, as it competed in no fewer Read More

1958 AC Aceca Bristol

1958 Aceca Bristol chassis BEX678

The Aceca Bristol offered here has its original Bristol engine, the number of which matches the car’s original firewall tag. According to the consignor, John Moir, the car’s original owner was Peter Winston, the son of renowned New York City jeweler Harry Winston.

Young Mr. Winston used the car as an everyday driver in Manhattan for some years, after which he sold it through an acquaintance to Tom Hickey, a well-known motorcycle and sports car Read More

1970 Range Rover

Courtesy of Silverstone Auctions

The original Spen King-designed Range Rover was one of the British motor industry’s proudest success stories. When it went out of production at the end of 1996, it still looked as fresh and forward-thinking as it did back in 1970, when one was chosen for an exhibit in the Louvre as an example of modern sculpture.

The car was renamed the Range Rover Classic when the Mk II model was introduced in the autumn of 1994, but demand continued even Read More

1954 Aston Martin DB2/4 Coupe

Ryan Merill ©2014, courtesy of RM Auctions

The BMIHT Certificate states that this DB2/4 was completed on February 2, 1954, and it was originally sold to a Scottish customer. While its early history is unknown, its build sheet documents an early factory engine replacement.

According to Anthony Forshaw, it is believed that its current engine is that period replacement unit. Aston Service Dorset has issued an amended build sheet and new chassis plate to cement the connection. The Aston was discovered in Virginia in 2008 by the Read More