1961 Jaguar E-Type Barn Find

Introduced in 3.8-liter form in 1961, the Jaguar E-type caused a sensation when it appeared, with instantly classic lines and a 150-mph top speed. Its design owed much to that of the racing D-type: a monocoque tub forming the main structure, while a tubular space frame extended forward to support the engine. The latter was the 3.8-liter, triple-carburetor S unit first offered as an option on the XK 150. The E-type’s performance did not disappoint: Read More

1969 Maserati Mistral Spyder

At the start of the 1950s, Maserati was still producing cars on a small scale. It built high-performance sports cars that were a little too demanding for the wealthy clientèle just starting to appear after the war.

The marque wanted to produce models that kept the same allure and were fast, but which had improved levels of comfort and security. The task of developing such a car was given to Giulio Alfieri, the brilliant engineer Read More

1950 Nash-Healey Roadster

What emerged from this two-year restoration process is nothing short of remarkable — Donald Healey’s own Nash-Healey, exactly as he built it, with no expense spared to ensure 100% historical accuracy. Restored by Tsikuris Classics — under the supervision by noted authority Bill Emerson. All major components are original to this car. With ownership history that begins with Donald Healey himself, there is no collection in the world, no matter how grand, that this car will not enhance.

A Tale of Two 1964 Ferrari 275 GTB 2-Cams

1964 Ferrari 275 GTB Berlinetta

Chassis number 06663 was originally built as a short-nose model with a steel body. Factory records show that the car was originally finished in Azzurro (blue) with Pelle Nera (black leather) interior.

Less than two weeks after it was sold to its first owner, 06663 was sold again. The new owner quickly put the car to work on the hillclimb circuit. Around the end of 1966, the owner ordered a long-nose front section from Scaglietti Read More

1953 Ferrari 340/375 MM Berlinetta Competizione

Combining rarity, powerful mechanical specifications, important racing history and ravishing coachwork, 0320AM is one of three 340/375 MM Works race cars that Ferrari entered at the 1953 24 Hours of Le Mans. Piloted by Mike Hawthorn and Nino Farina, 0320AM advanced to 2nd place before being disqualified for violating an obscure and old rule that prohibited the addition of fluids before the 28th lap.

0320AM was built on a late 340 MM chassis and featured a 4.1-liter Read More

1960 Aston Martin DB4GT “Jet” coupe

Coachbuilt examples of the DB4/5/6 family of Aston Martins are extremely rare, making the unique Bertone-bodied car offered here all the more precious and desirable. Chassis 0201L is the last DB4GT chassis completed in period and was first displayed on Bertone’s stand at the 1961 Geneva Motor Show, followed by an appearance at Turin that same year.

Its designer was none other than Giorgetto Giugiaro, one of the 20th century’s foremost automotive stylists and then only 22 years of Read More

1953 Moretti 750 Gran Sport Berlinetta

Giovanni Moretti made his name with racing engines for motorcycles. Following World War II, he began making small automobiles, the first powered by his own vertical twin-cylinder engine. In 1950, he developed a 4-cylinder overhead-cam engine, in both 600-cc and 750-cc sizes. Built on a backbone chassis, it was a lively package and available in several body styles.

Morettis achieved significant competition success, particularly those fitted with the twin-cam version of the 750 engine. Bodies came from Read More

1986 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2-Liter Supersport Cabriolet

Porsche revived the Carrera name — previously used for the competition-orientated versions of the preceding 356 — for its luxuriously equipped, top-of-the-range 911 in 1973. It applied the evocative title to all 911 models, coincidentally with the introduction of the 3.2-liter engine, from 1984. Not merely enlarged, the new engine was also extensively revised and produced 231 horsepower, 27 horsepower up on its predecessor. The 911 Carrera’s top speed was now 152 mph, with 100 mph reachable in a Read More

1967 Toyota 2000GT

The Toyota 2000GT is perhaps the best sports car you’ve never heard of. Developed in conjunction with Yamaha, this slinky 2-passenger coupe packed a 2-liter inline 6-cylinder engine with a cast-iron block and double overhead cams, good for 150 horsepower at 7,000 rpm and a top speed of over 135 mph.

The luxurious interior fittings, including a rosewood veneer dashboard and a signal-seeking radio, were described as “up to par for a luxurious GT — an impressive car in which Read More

1954 Chrysler GS-1 Special by Ghia

During the 1950s, Italian coachbuilder Ghia built numerous one-off “dream cars” for Chrysler Corporation. One, the slab-sided and extremely modern “Thomas Special,” named for Chrysler export executive C.B. Thomas, was so well received at European shows that a limited run of duplicates was produced for European customers. Others soon followed, including the so-called Ghia Special.

Chrysler’s Export Division had two 1954 Chrysler New Yorker Deluxe chassis, each with a 125.5-inch wheelbase frame, a 235-horsepower Hemi V8, and a PowerFlite automatic Read More