1953 Chrisman Bonneville Coupe

While this car was created to race, it combines a high level of technical
competence in construction with the highest standard of finish

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Hot rodders Art and Lloyd Chrisman were early and successful pioneers of drag racing with their famous #25 dragster, which was the first to achieve trap speeds of 140 mph and 180 mph in the quarter-mile.

Early experience gained on the dry lakebeds of Southern Read More

1996 Ferrari 456 GT Coupe

I’ve often told people trying to squeak into a Ferrari that if they can’t afford the best example, they really can’t afford an edgy one

Not since the 412’s demise in 1989 had Ferrari offered a 2+2, and when the 456 GT debuted at the Paris Salon in October 1992, it was obvious that the long-awaited newcomer eclipsed all Maranello’s previous four-seat Grand Tourers.

Although new from stem to stern, the Read More

The Unaffordable Classic

A dead DS that has settled to the bottom of the suspension travel is likely to become part of the fossil record at precisely the spot where it died

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The introduction of the Citroën DS19 at the Paris Motor Show in 1955 had all the drama of Klaatu’s flying saucer landing in Washington, DC in the 1950s sci-fi movie “The Day the Earth Stood Still.” By the end of the Read More

1956 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing Coupe

At its launch, the 300SL cost more than twice the price of a Jaguar XK 140. Today, it’s worth about four times as much

Mercedes-Benz returned to postwar competition in 1952, fielding two of its new 300SL (W194) sports cars in the Mille Miglia. The pair finished a creditable 2nd and 4th overall in this most difficult of events, and the promising start was followed up by a win in the challenging Read More

1952 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 Villa d’Este Cabriolet

Hand-built and extremely rare, it’s the last example of the kind of cars that made the company’s reputation between the wars

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In 1935, Alfa Romeo introduced a new model, the 6C 2300B. Once again, the work of the great Vittorio Jano was to take Alfa Romeo in a new direction by offering one of the first cars available with fully independent suspension-pure racing technology from the current Grand Prix car. Read More

1961 Morgan Plus 4

If the buyer plans sedate ice-cream runs with grandkids in the back, four seats might have an advantage

In 1936, the Morgan 4/4 debuted as the company’s first four-wheeled car. The designation 4/4 stood for four cylinders and four wheels. The vehicles that Morgan had produced prior to the 4/4 were three-wheelers with V-twin engines, hence the need to differentiate. Production of the 4/4 continued for over 70 years, except for a Read More

1956 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing Coupe

Mercedes-Benz returned to postwar competition in 1952, fielding two of its new 300SL (W194) sports cars in the Mille Miglia. The pair finished a creditable 2nd and 4th overall in this most difficult of events, and the promising start was followed up by a win in the challenging La Carrera Panamericana.

The Works first raced the 300SL (Sport Leicht) in open form, but for the 24 Hours of Le Mans in June, a trio of “gullwing”-doored coupes was entered. High Read More

1969 Ford Mustang Boss 429

The aluminum heads had intakes that could swallow a tennis ball, which was great for 200-mph laps around Daytona

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In 1969, Ford introduced a limited-production model to the Mustang line. This addition was the Boss 429. It was the most powerful Mustang, and the name referred to its 429-ci engine, which was built in response to Chrysler’s 426-ci Hemi and its success in NASCAR.

Named after stylist Larry Shinoda’s nickname Read More

1951 Ferrari 340 America Coupe

“Prime Motoring Fool” Bob Sutherland took a savage pleasure in driving anything, but said his 340 Mexico was just too awful

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Intended primarily as a competition car for wealthy privateers, the 340 was directed specifically at a new and increasingly profitable market-the United States. Aptly named “America,” the 340 became the first of many subsequent sports racing Ferraris built to meet the demands of the American market, where it proved Read More

A Beetle in a Lovely Italian Suit

The real bug with any Karmann-Ghia is rust. It’s claimed nearly all of the early cars, and it can appear anywhere on the body

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By the mid-1950s, it appeared certain that the West German economic miracle would be sustained. Luxury models from BMW and Mercedes-Benz began to reappear. Even Volkswagen began to consider something more special than the prosaic Beetle sedan.

The Italian coachbuilder Ghia had proposed designs for Read More