1930 Citroën Kégresse “Forestiere” Autochenille

A curious mixture of romantic visionary and practical businessman, André Citroën knew a promising invention when he saw one. French-born Adolphe Kégresse had developed an idea at the behest of his erstwhile employer, Czar Nicholas II, who had wanted a means of adapting his cars to drive across deep snow.

Rather than use the heavy steel hinged plates of a conventional crawler tractor, Kégresse devised a lightweight system that employed rubber bands running around bogies driven from the rear axle. Read More

Triumph’s Joan Rivers

When Karmann face-lifted the Triumph TR4 in 1968, there were still some arthritic old bones behind the TR6’s wide smile and smooth skin

The age of the biplane fighter lasted from roughly 1915 to 1941, by which time the last of the fabric-covered, fixed-gear aircraft like the Gloster Gladiator and Fiat CR42 were looking quite antique. The Triumph TR6 was the Gloster Gladiator of sports cars: If not absolutely the last traditional Read More

1965 Chevrolet Chevelle Z16 Prototype

It’s quite possible the Z16 was the first Chevrolet product to be powered by the legendary big-block, beating its counterparts by a few weeks

The early success of other GM division big-block cars pushed Chevrolet to pump up the power in its 1965 Chevelle in a big way, stuffing the smallish mid-sized mainstay with the hairiest 396 available-the 375-horsepower Z16. With only 200 coupes and one convertible slated for the market, a Read More

1990 Ferrari 641/2 F1

The buzz at the auction was that this car was unusual and desirable in being completely ready to run with the F1 Clienti. The buyer bought it for that purpose

Ferrari entered 1990 with a dream driver lineup. Nigel Mansell was in his second season with the Scuderia and Alain Prost was making his debut with the Maranello team. Ferrari would have its best season in years. Steve Nichols joined Ferrari from Read More

1970 Aston Martin DB6 Mk II

Two things kept the price down: British buyers are notoriously suspicious of automatics in “sporty” cars; and it was presented on a cheap set of tires

The culmination of Aston Martin’s long-running line of “DB” 6-cylinder sports saloons, the DB6 was introduced in 1965. Aston Martin lengthened the wheelbase by four inches over the DB5 and undertook an extensive restyle, incorporating a more raked windscreen, raised roofline, and reshaped rear quarter windows.

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1980 BMW M1 Coupe

This was an extraordinary result, greater than the next highest street M1 sale on record by nearly 50%

A proposed Group 5 “Silhouette Formula” for production-based cars triggered the M1 program in the mid-1970s, a mid-engined concept car designed in-house at BMW by Paul Bracq providing the basis. Ex-racing driver Jochen Neerpasch was responsible for initiating this ambitious project, whose aims included taking on rival Porsche in the World Sports Car Championship Read More

1957 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa

These cars brought Maranello four World Constructors Championships and four victories at Le Mans. Few, if any, cars have a more impressive resume

In 1957, the Commission Sportive Internationale contemplated new rules to make sports car racing safer after the 1955 disaster at Le Mans. Anticipating a reduction in capacity for sports cars, Ferrari began working on a car powered by the 3-liter V12 engine. Ferrari first used the name Testa Rossa Read More

1905 Gardner-Serpollet 18hp Type L Steamer

A growing audience is succumbing to the lure of early steamers, resulting in some remarkable transactions

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When eccentric collector George Milligen died in 2004, his family kept one of his cars when the others were sold. Five years later, they have decided to sell George’s 1905 Gardner-Serpollet Type L steam car, only one of two known.

Bankrolled by wealthy American Frank Gardner, Parisian Leon Serpollet developed his flash tube boiler Read More

Ferrari 400: Sensible Italian Shoes?

Buy a Ferrari 400 with needs and you may as well start thinking about ways to improve on Bernie Madoff’s Ponzi scheme

The mid 1970s were cruel to the entire auto industry, and the Italian exotics were particularly hard hit. Punitive taxes, fuel shortages, and a general reluctance to consume conspicuously put Maserati and Lamborghini on the ropes. Even Ferrari wasn’t immune.

Worse still, class warfare turned into open warfare when Read More

1934 Auburn 1250 Salon Cabriolet

Even at $253,000, this car is still less than half the price of some Packard V12 Cabriolets

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This 1934 Auburn 1250 Salon Cabriolet was driven by James Cagney in the 1930s film “The Mayor of Hell.” It was restored over 20 years ago, and it’s been certified by the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Club, which means it has its original chassis, engine, and drivetrain.

The Salon model was the top Read More