1956 Bentley S1 Continental Sports Saloon

Bentley’s magnificent Continental sports saloon has been synonymous with effortless high speed cruising at its grandest since its introduction on the R-type chassis in 1952. Unlike the ordinary, factory-bodied, “standard steel” R-type, the Continental was bodied in aluminum over a steel frame and first appeared with what many enthusiasts consider to be the model’s definitive style of coachwork-the lightweight, wind tunnel-developed, fastback of HJ Mulliner.

The Continental’s performance figures would have been considered excellent for an out-and-out sports car, but Read More

1928 Bugatti Type 35C Grand Prix

Almost 80 years after its introduction, the Bugatti Type 35 remains one of the most iconic and historically significant cars to have ever raced. Without doubt, the Type 35 was responsible for Bugatti’s rise to the heights of 1920s Grand Prix racing and quickly became the most dominant participant of its era.

The Type 35 is renowned for its featherweight chassis and low center of gravity. These factors combined made these relatively diminutive GP cars extremely manoeuvrable, especially on short Read More

1930 Duesenberg J Murphy Sport Berline

More than half of all the Model Js produced were closed and were generally more expensive and popular than the sporty, open cars. Styling was mostly both very conservative and conventional. However, Murphy of Pasadena, California, was an exception among Duesenberg coachbuilders, for their unique sedans were sporting.

George Whittell Jr. bought more new Duesenbergs than anyone else. He was one of America’s most colorful millionaires, sole heir to the marriage of two Californian fortunes. His grandfathers had gained their Read More

1969 Chevrolet Camaro Trans Am Race Car

This Camaro is the car that Vince Gimondo drove to a 2nd in class at the 12 Hours of Sebring, 9th overall at Watkins Glen, and 2nd at the American Road Race of Champions (ARRC) at Daytona in the 1969 season.

For 1970, Gimondo drove this car to a 1st in class and 14th overall at the 12 Hours of Sebring; he finished in the top ten in Trans Am events at Lime Rock, Mid-Ohio, and Bridgehampton, placed 11th at Read More

1955-57 Ford Thunderbird

The immediate post-war era saw sports cars enter the American consciousness for the first time since the days of the Mercer Raceabout and the Stutz Bearcat. By the early 1950s-in addition to foreigners like MG, Jaguar, Aston Martin, and Ferrari-Ford had to stomach American independents and upstarts dabbling in sports cars, most notably tiny manufacturers like Kaiser, Hudson, Nash, Crosley, Kurtis, and Muntz. The final straw came when arch rival Chevrolet introduced the Corvette in June of 1953, though really, Read More

1963 Ferrari 250 GTE NHRA Pro Street

Few cars shock the senses quite like a well-executed Pro Street machine, and this gleaming black Ferrari 250 GTE may be the most shocking Pro Street car we have ever seen.

This is believed to be the world’s only Pro Street version of the Prancing Horse. Professionally built and based on a real Ferrari 250 GTE berlinetta, it is filled with all the ingredients that separate NHRA’s top street class from the rest-a free-breathing hood scoop, a pro-built 565-cubic-inch Chevrolet Read More

1973 Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RS Lightweight

The Carrera 2.7 RS has long been regarded as one of the great cars of all time and, by some, the greatest of all road-going Porsches. Their competition achievements speak for themselves, while their on-road performance remains special to this day. Even the extraordinary (for the period) 0-60 mph acceleration time of circa 5.5 seconds and mean top speed of around 150 mph give little clue to the excitement these cars can engender. By paring the weight down to 2,150 Read More

1965 Aston Martin DB5

“Opinions vary greatly-and inevitably-on which is the ‘best’ of the new breed of Aston Martins. Sir David Brown puts his money on the DB5.”-Geoff Courtney, The Power Behind Aston Martin

The DB5 arrived in the autumn of 1963, essentially a positive development of the Series V DB4, sharing its classic Superleggera body construction devised by Touring of Milan. It was distinguished primarily by its larger, more powerful 4-liter version of the DB4 straight-6 unit, with triple SU carburetors (as standard) Read More

1935 Avions Voisin C25 Aérodyne

With a price of 88,000 francs when new, the purchase of an Aérodyne truly represented a small fortune, compared with the 70,000 francs asked for a Bugatti 57 Galibier or with the 22,000 francs necessary to buy one of the very new Citroën Traction 11 Légère sedans…

The car was revolutionary in form, with keel-shaped fenders and a hood integrated in the streamline shape very much then in fashion, but it was also technically revolutionary with its sliding roof powered Read More

1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427/435 Convertible-The “Survivor Platform Car”

In recent years the word “survivor” has gradually entered the collector car lexicon as a way of describing a well-preserved, original, unrestored vehicle. “Survivor,” in context, is also a trademark registered to Bloomington Gold founder David Burroughs. And in 1989, this Marlboro Maroon 1967 427 convertible became Burroughs’s benchmark for establishing standards for the Bloomington Gold Survivor Award.

For years, Burroughs had encouraged the owners of original Corvettes to forego restoration and preserve their originality, even searching out and buying Read More