The First Civilian Jeeps Are Still a Rugged Deal

It didn’t take long for the Army’s quarter-ton, four-wheel-drive reconnaissance car to catch the fancy of the American soldier during World War II — and of the American public in general.

The Jeep as made by Ford (GPW) and Willys (MB) was often an object of desire for when the war would be over.

Willys began experimenting with a post-war civilian Jeep in secret — as much from the government as the industry — as early as 1944. Prototypes were Read More

1943 International Harvester M5 Half-Track

  • Used during the Allied liberation of Europe, most likely with the Polish forces
  • Subsequently seconded to the French Army, which stationed it in French Guyana, South America, for decades
    Brought back to France during the 1980s and sold to Belgian collector and Supreme Court Judge Mr. Louis Amerijckx, who stored it in the grounds of his chateau
  • Acquired from Mr. Amerijckx by Ivo Rigter in 1987 and treated to a 2,500-hour, chassis-up restoration over the next 27 years
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Sifting the Auctions for Hidden Gems

The old saying of “Can’t see the forest for the trees” also applies to good deals at the Monterey Car Week auctions.

Despite auction houses working to get high-end cars for record-setting sales prices, there are inevitably a few consignments that don’t fare as well as hoped.

Throw in car consignments that are staged to fill in less-desirable time slots — or to lead or follow heavily hyped vehicles — and a screaming deal will appear once in a while.

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Durable, Good-Looking and Cheap

If you have a hankering for an older Multi-Purpose Vehicle (old enough to predate the whole soccer-mom SUV thing), but feel that you missed the boat on first-generation Ford Broncos or 1969–72 Chevy Blazers, I have good news for you.

There’s one out there made in large enough quantities that availability is good, parts support is excellent, and it is still priced at chump change: the 1980–96 full-size Ford Bronco.

The genesis of the Bronco line, the first generation built Read More

1944 Chrysler M4A4 Sherman Tank

The M4 is undoubtedly the most famous World War II Allied tank. It was the most-produced American tank during World War II, with close to 50,000 units (all versions included).

The British gave the tank its nickname, “Sherman,” when they got delivery of their first units through the Lend-Lease agreement. “Sherman” referenced the American Civil War Union General William Tecumseh Sherman. The U.S. Army quickly adopted this nickname.

This M4A4 Sherman tank recently joined the Normandy Tank Museum collection and Read More

In Memoriam: Chet Krause

Chet Krause; December 16, 1923 – June 25, 2016

Chester Lee “Chet” Krause, founder of Kruse Publications and the Iola Old Car Show, passed away on June 25.

He was 92.

To state that Chet left an indelible mark in the collector car hobby would be an understatement.

Born in rural Wisconsin near the village of Iola, he grew up in the area and graduated from Iola High School in 1941. He served his country during World War II in Read More

1991 AM General M998 Humvee

From the Ground Force Collection, this 1991 authentic military M998 Humvee/M998 Humvee cargo/troop carrier is built for almost every terrain imaginable and gets to its final destination. It has automatic transmission, a strong 6.2-liter diesel engine, a removable cargo cover, and was upgraded throughout its military life. Due to U.S. military rules, this vehicle cannot be exported and must be purchased by a U.S. citizen.

1972 BMW 3.0 CSL

Scott Nidermaier, courtesy of Bonhams

The early 1970s were landmark years for BMW, for not only did the German manufacturer power Jean-Pierre Jarier to the European Formula 2 Championship, it also captured the European Touring Car Championship using one of the most iconic racing saloons of modern times: the 3.0 CSL, known popularly as the Batmobile.

BMW had returned to 6-cylinder power for its range-topping models in 1968 with the launch of the 2500 and 2800 saloons. Also new was the 3.0 CSL’s forerunner, the Read More

A Mercedes for the Farm, Woods or Battlefield

In the United States, Mercedes-Benz Unimogs are rare enough to qualify as mild curiosities, but these tough, fear-no-road trucks are also inching up on the cool meter, especially with military-vehicle buffs.

You’ll see them scattered around the countryside — often in the mountain areas of the western United States — but few know their long, fascinating history.

For example, Unimogs were originally designed as farm vehicles. Let’s jump into the Wayback Machine for a little Unimog history.

Out of the Read More