1960 Volkswagen Double-Cab Pickup

No such critter like this was available new from Volkswagen—no matter how many option boxes were checked off

Introduced in 1950, the Volkswagen Type 2 effectively doubled the product line of the thriving German car company. Utilizing the same rear-engine air-cooled format as the overwhelmingly successful Beetle, the various Type 2 models featured new dimensions of passenger and cargo space in an ingeniously designed lightweight structure.

Single- and double-cab versions were sold in Read More

1963 Porsche Diesel Standard Model 217 Tractor

Granted, rallies and track days are pretty much out of the question, but you can still have a field day with a Porsche-Diesel—literally

Dr. Ferdinand Porsche’s wide-ranging interests in all things mechanical—and practical—led him to include designs for farm tractors in his project portfolio beginning in the 1930s.

As with all things from Dr. Porsche’s fertile creativity, the tractors owed little to convention and much to efficiency and imagination. The earliest Porsche tractor designs were modular, Read More

1964 Volkswagen Type 2 Microbus Deluxe

VW won the hearts of collectors. The best first-generation Ford Econoline would be hard pressed to bring $10k, even with $5k in pennies in the back

The Type 2, as its name suggests, was the second variant of the VW Beetle (Type 1), using the same running gear, and was introduced in 1950. Multiple types, as well as “specials,” were always offered, ranging from panel van to camper and even fire engine. Read More

1959 Volkswagen 1200 2-Door Sedan

The pool of original cars continues to shrink, thanks to fires, floods, rust, and kids with a hankering to build a sand rail

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The Volkswagen Beetle sedan inspired unusual loyalty and enthusiasm based on its practicality, reliability, adaptability, and affordability. Originally conceived by Dr. Ferdinand Porsche in the earliest days of his consulting engineering company, it was shopped to various German manufacturers in the early 1930s, but it wasn’t until Read More

1964 Ford Galaxie 500 Hard Top

My 9-year-old son was very agitated as I loaded the car. He said “Dad, you can replace any one of the others-this is unique”

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Built by tobacco heir Zachary Reynolds, the “Tobacco King” 1964 Ford Galaxie was as wild an example of a Rocket Drag Axle-equipped car as one could ask for.

Playboy, pilot, ham radio enthusiast, and all-around enfant terrible, Reynolds wanted a car that would terrorize everyone Read More

1963 Dual-Ghia L6.4 Coupe

If the Chrysler-powered Facel-Vega is a French Imperial, consider the L6.4
a Mopar Maserati

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The brainchild of Eugene Casaroll, the Italian-American hybrid known as the Dual-Ghia was largely based on the Ghia-designed Chrysler Firearrow, a concept car for which he acquired the production rights. Luxurious and extravagant, it had the longest production line in the world-from Detroit to Milan and back-as it utilized an American drivetrain and Italian coachwork. Read More

1965 Pontiac GTO Convertible

I suspect the judges who previously gave this car an AACA Senior badge would not have done so on sale day

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Pontiac first offered the GTO option on the Tempest in 1964, and despite UAW strikes, which kept production down, it was a big hit.

The muscle car market was evolving, and in 1965, the GTO was named Motor Trend Magazine’s Car of the Year. It was easily distinguished Read More

1965 Shelby GT350 “Supercharged”

Unveiled by Carroll Shelby on January 27, 1965, the GT350 fastback had a fiberglass hood and functional scoop, and a clean-looking grille with a tri-color horse on the driver’s side. All 1965 Shelbys were Wimbledon White with a blue GT350 side stripe below the door. Dealer option Le Mans stripes were available, running down the center of the body.

The interior was black with a flat wood-rimmed wheel. A special instrument cluster in the center of the dash carried a Read More

1975-76 Chevrolet Cosworth-Vega

It’s not hard to find a well-maintained, low-mileage car, as they were something of an “instant collectible” in their day, with a small but ardent following

When Chevrolet’s new compact, the Vega, came to the market for 1971, it was intended to compete with imports landing on both U.S. coasts.

Shortly before the car’s introduction, then Chevrolet General Manager John Z. DeLorean directed his staff to develop a high-performance “halo car” Read More

M3A1 Stuart Light Tank

British troops called the gasoline-powered American tanks ‘Ronsons.’ Like the cigarette lighter slogan of the day, they ‘lit the first time when struck’

The catalog description for the M3 Stuart light tank was sparse but pithy.
Manufacturer: American Car & Foundry Co., U.S.A. Crew: Four. Engine: Continental W-670-9A; 7-cyl. engine. Length: 450cm. Width: 246cm. Height: 230cm. Approx. Weight: 14.25 tons. Armament: One 37mm gun. Two replica 30-inch machine guns