1968 Ferrari 365 GT 2+2 Coupe

Surprisingly, 50% of all Ferraris produced by the mid-1960s were built with four seats.

The 365 GT 2+2 was launched at the Paris Salon in October 1967. Sleekly styled in the manner of the limited-edition 500 Superfast, the 365 GT 2+2 was the most refined Ferrari to date.

Based on the contemporary 330 GTC, the chassis was made of Ferrari’s familiar combination of oval and round steel tubing. Developing 320 hp in its 365 GT incarnation, the well-proven 4.4-liter V12 Read More

1934/37 MG K3 Magnette Roadster

Determined to extend MG’s racing and record-breaking activities into Class G (1,100 cc), Managing Director Cecil Kimber announced the MG K-series “Magnette” range at the October 1932 London Motor Show. It comprised the roadgoing K1 (four-seater) and K2 (two-seater), as well as the sports racing K3.

Two of the first three production MG K3s finished 1st and 2nd in the 1,100-cc class of the 1933 Mille Miglia. As a result, MG became the first non-Italian manufacturer to be awarded the Read More

1937 Renault TN4H Autobus

Founded by Louis Renault and his brothers Marcel and Fernand in 1898, Renault engineering was of the highest quality, from the outset. The arrival of multi-cylinder models in 1900 really put the company on the map.

As well as motor cars, Renault manufactured taxis, buses, and commercial vehicles in the years before the Great War, and during hostilities branched out into munitions, military aircraft, and armored vehicles. By the war’s end, this diversification had seen Renault established as France’s biggest Read More

1932 Ford Khougaz Lakes Roadster

Ford’s classic 1932 roadster, better known as “the Deuce,” is the quintessential hot rod. Great-looking, with timeless lines, light weight, especially when shorn of its fenders, equipped with a souped-up Ford flathead developing three to four times its original output, and transmitting that power through a 3-speed top-loader with a Lincoln-Zephyr close-ratio cluster, this historic roadster, and many like it, were enthusiastically raced at California’s dry lakes and later at the Bonneville Salt Flats.

Top speeds of over 130 mph Read More

1968 Ferrari 365 GT 2+2 Coupe

Surprisingly, 50% of all Ferraris produced by the mid-1960s were built with four seats.

The 365 GT 2+2 was launched at the Paris Salon in October 1967. Sleekly styled in the manner of the limited-edition 500 Superfast, the 365 GT 2+2 was the most refined Ferrari to date.

Based on the contemporary 330 GTC, the chassis was made of Ferrari’s familiar combination of oval and round steel tubing. Developing 320 hp in its 365 GT incarnation, the well-proven 4.4-liter V12 Read More

1969 Ford Escort 1850 GT World Cup Rally Car

The toughest post-war test for motor car and crew ever is reckoned to have been the 1970 London to Mexico World Cup Rally, upon which 96 intrepid starters-seven of them Ford factory team Escorts-embarked from Wembley Stadium on April 19.

The 16,000-mile route across mainland Europe, South, and Central America required competitors to ascend hazardous passes as high as 16,000 feet in the Andes and tackle dusty primes as long as 600 miles at required speeds of up to 93 Read More

1952 Jaguar C-type Roadster

Jaguar’s chief engineer William Heynes said that until he went to the 1950 Le Mans race, he had “never seriously contemplated designing a car for racing.” Then he watched Leslie Johnson push his more or less standard XK 120 as high as 3rd until the clutch failed.

William Lyons watched the race with Heynes, and Johnson’s performance was enough to convince Lyons of the car’s potential: Jaguar was going racing, with the aim to win Le Mans in 1951.

Work Read More

1938 Bugatti Type 57C Special Coupe

With so many spectacular Bugattis, it takes a special car to stand out. It’s safe to say that this one-of-a-kind Type 57C Special coupe is one of the most intriguing Bugattis ever constructed.

In June 1938, this car was built at the Bugatti factory in Molsheim. The frame, no. 278, was equipped with a blown Type 57 engine, 4-speed gearbox and rear end, all numbered 486. This car was originally issued chassis no. 57335, a number from an earlier Bugatti Read More

1965 Shelby Cobra Daytona Coupe

In 1963, Shelby’s new Cobra had established its supremacy on the short road courses of America, but Shelby and Ford shared a more ambitious goal-to beat Ferrari to the Federation Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA) World Manufacturer’s Championship for GT cars.

After victories at Le Mans and Goodwood, Shelby narrowly missed the 1964 championship, vowing to return next year. In February 1965, Shelby entered four coupes at Daytona, among them CSX2601, which retired with a blown engine after eight hours.

Another Read More

1949 Talbot-Lago T26 Grand Prix

What this is about is the pre-war Grand Prix experience in an attainable, moderately bomb-proof and reliable package

The Talbot-Lago T26 Grand Prix took its double barreled name from an ex-military major who in France was known as Antoine, in England as Tony, but in his native Venice, Italy, had been christened Antonio Lago. Major Tony Lago had spent most of his professional life in the motor industry. In the 1920s he Read More