1968 Mercury Cougar GT-E 427 Coupe

This rare cat—the last Ford car equipped with the 427-ci engine—brought enough money to shake a few more of its kind onto the market

Coming off winning Motor Trend’s Car of the Year award in 1967 with the Cougar, Mercury designers wanted to create something in 1968 that would set the automotive world on its ear. The Cougar was already a step above the Mustang in styling and comfort, so designers decided to stuff the potent 427 FE into a Cougar package—creating the ultimate blend of power and styling. The result was the Cougar GT-E.

Equipped with the legendary 427 side oiler engine Ford used to homologate its NASCAR racing program, the GT-E represents the end of an era, as it was the last Ford product sold with the 427, and the only Ford product sold with it in ‘68. At a cost of over $1,300, the GT-E package was perhaps the most radical performance package ever offered in a pony car. Factory options included C-6 Merc-O-Matic transmission, FR70x14 wide oval radial tires, power disc brakes, power steering, AM radio, décor interior group and styled steel wheels. The factory GT-E package included blacked out front headlamp cover and special front trim, blacked out taillight bezels, special extruded aluminum body side moldings, 3.50 standard axle ratio with nodular 9-inch rear end, super competition handling package, engine dress-up package, and a two-tone paint scheme.

There are only 78,316 original miles on its matching-numbers drivetrain.

This tireless five-year restoration was completed recently in carefully documented, factory-shipped detail. All original or N.O.S. parts were used exclusively throughout. This car is registered with the Cougar National Database and the Cougar GT-E registry. Painstaking attention to detail has resulted in what many Cougar professionals believe to be one of the most complete and correct examples of this rare car known to date.

Dale Novak

Dale Novak - SCM Contributor

Dale started his love of cars by collecting Hot Wheels as a child. His first car was a dead 1970 Dodge Challenger 440 R/T, acquired for the princely sum of $500. He’s been buying, selling, restoring, collecting and otherwise obsessing over classic cars ever since. Dale serves as the voice of Auctions America as well as Tom Mack and Carlisle Auctions. He also serves as a Contributor and Senior Auction Analyst for SCM and ACC. Dale’s collection includes a 1966 Sunbeam Tiger, a “Mister Norm’s” 1970 Dodge Challenger 440 R/T and an ultra-rare 1940 Plymouth convertible (to name a few). When he’s not immersed in the world of classic cars, Dale applies his talents as a seasoned marketing and advertising consultant.

Posted in American