1980 Triumph Spitfire 1500

They were cited by motoring journalists as an example of the thrills to be found in driving slow cars quickly

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The Triumph Spitfire 1500, according to the original brochure, is a true sports car whose classic lines express “the harmony of power and grace which is the car’s hallmark.” The brochure boasted that the 1,493-cc engine is strict on fuel but generous on power. Developing 71 bhp at 5,500 rpm, Read More

1965 Aston Martin DB5 Coupe “James Bond”

James Bond’s Aston Martin DB5, which roared into the public consciousness in the 1964 movie “Goldfinger,” has a fair claim on being “The Most Famous Car in the World,” as Dave Worrall’s 1993 book asserts.

That Silver Birch DB5 embodied the virtues of the character first launched in Ian Fleming’s spy novels in 1953: stunning elegance, international intrigue, and visceral power.

But in 1963, Aston Martin was one of the world’s smallest and most obscure automakers, hand-making about 200 cars Read More

1956 Jaguar XK 140 “MC” Roadster

During the Second World War, William Lyons and his colleagues conceived a new car design that featured the world’s first high volume twin-cam engine, called the XK series. A short wheelbase chassis and a two-seat sports roadster body were married to this new engine and the result was nothing less than sensational-sleek, beautiful, and strikingly modern.

The XK 120 made its first appearance for public view at the Earls Court Motor Show in October 1948. What an introduction it was, Read More

1962 Jaguar XKE 3.8 Roadster

Early E-types had a variety of distinctive styling features that complemented the elegance of their lines, though not all of them were practical

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The new E-type had understandably received rave reviews at the Geneva Auto Show in March 1961, so Jaguar Cars Inc. geared up for another public relations coup as the new model arrived in the U.S. The launch was accompanied by all the pomp and circumstance Jaguar and Read More

1955 Austin-Healey 100 Le Mans

Dealers were using the Le Mans kit to tart up cars and help move them off the showroom floor

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This is a rare Austin-Healey with factory Le Mans options, finished in beautiful Reno Red and black. Notice the vented hood with leather strap, fold down windshield, and original dual carbs with original 100M Le Mans tag intact.
Equipped with all options including overdrive, its credentials include scoring 96.1 points Read More

1950 Jaguar XK120 roadster

According to an interview with Sir William in the 1970s, the design was
created, start-to-finish, in less than three weeks

The first post-war auto salon held in London, the Earls Court British Motor Show, opened its doors on October 27, 1948. No one was prepared for the shock caused by the unveiling of the bronze-colored Jaguar roadster, the XK 120. William Lyons raised the bar for sports cars with this model, Read More

1958 Aston Martin DB Mk III Saloon

The Mk III is the most desirable of the Astons assembled at the Lagonda works, with increased power, better gearing, and improved brakes

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Two years after the introduction of the DB2/4 Mk II came the DB Mk III-the suffix “2/4” now dropped. The Mk III retained the one-piece grille with the raised center portion introduced on the DB2/4s, but gave the car the more graceful curves that have distinguished the Read More

1966-76 Jensen Interceptor

If one bought cars by the pound, Jensen Interceptors would be the best value in the marketplace. Produced in Great Britain during the death throes of the Jensen company and following the time-honored traditions of British companies installing big American engines into Italian-designed bodies, these cars are large, heavy and dirt-cheap. With space for a golf foursome, complete with bags, and sporting a Chrysler V8, the car was huge by contemporary English standards. Aluminum and fiberglass minimized the weight, Read More

1973 Jaguar XKE SIII V12 Convertible

If ever there was an auto manufacturer to take lessons learned from racing and apply them to their street cars, it was Jaguar. The legendary D-type was a formidable competitor on the track and Jaguar included all the D’s best traits when it debuted the E-type in 1961.

Arguably the most well recognized sports car of its era, the E-type had a perfect combination of curvaceous lines, high performance and affordable price. This winning combination helped establish it Read More

1963 Triumph TR4 Surrey Top

Other than the 1800/2000 roadsters, the TR2 was the first, true postwar Triumph sports car. It was superceded in 1955 by the TR3, which was simply an evolution of the TR2, with the most important additions being a horsepower increase to 90 bhp, a new grille, and front disc brakes-a first for an affordable sports car.
The arrival of the TR4 signaled the end of one era and the beginning of another. A completely new body featured wind-up windows, Read More

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