1958 AC Ace Bristol Roadster

The Ace retains a poise that’s absent from its meatier derivative, offering high-geared steering, enough body roll to orient the driver, and a firm brake pedal

Introduced in October 1953, the AC Ace was essentially a reworked version of LOY 500, the handsome John Tojeiro-designed sports racer with which motor trader Cliff Davis had notched up six wins and four seconds that season (in addition to placing 9th overall at the Goodwood Read More

1958 AC Ace Bristol Roadster

Introduced in October 1953, the AC Ace was essentially a reworked version of LOY 500, the handsome John Tojeiro-designed sports racer with which motor trader Cliff Davis had notched up six wins and four seconds that season (in addition to placing 9th overall at the Goodwood Nine Hours).
Lured into collaboration with the Thames Ditton manufacturer by the promise of a £5 ($17.85) per car royalty fee (capped at £500, $1,785), Tojeiro ensured that the new model’s ladder-framed tubular Read More

1970 Aston Martin DB6 Mk II

Two things kept the price down: British buyers are notoriously suspicious of automatics in “sporty” cars; and it was presented on a cheap set of tires

The culmination of Aston Martin’s long-running line of “DB” 6-cylinder sports saloons, the DB6 was introduced in 1965. Aston Martin lengthened the wheelbase by four inches over the DB5 and undertook an extensive restyle, incorporating a more raked windscreen, raised roofline, and reshaped rear quarter windows.

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1968 Lotus 51R

Even if another road racer comes along claiming to be the Flower Power car, this one wears the right chassis and registration numbers

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Formula Ford was introduced in Great Britain in 1967 as a new form of poor man’s motor racing. Written into its regulations was the requirement for commercially built FFs to be priced at no more than £1,000 ($2,400).

The category took off-after a slowish start-to become the Read More

1954 Arnolt-Bristol Bolide

This car had come straight out of a $55,000 restoration and the restorer was on hand on sale day to answer questions, which always helps

Stanley Harold “Wacky” Arnolt made a fortune selling engines and other equipment to the armed forces during WWII. A lifelong motorhead, he set up SH Arnolt, Inc. in Chicago during the late 1940s to distribute MGs and other European imports.

At the 1952 Turin Salon, Arnolt Read More

1939 Jaguar SS 100 3½-Liter Roadster

Any patina has been lost in a slightly over-shiny restoration and repaint, though it does have a big history file and is eligible for many prestige events

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Launched for 1936, the SS 100 was the first real high-performance model produced by SS Cars Limited, and used a new Weslake-developed overhead-valve engine in a shortened SS 1 chassis.

The Swallow Sidecar & Coachbuilding Company had been founded in Blackpool, England, Read More

1976 Lotus Esprit S1

Even if the “real”-or “other,” if you prefer-Lotus appeared in most of the
action shots, we can fairly say this car has Bond film provenance

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The Lotus Esprit was unveiled as the Silver Car concept at the Turin Motor Show in November 1972. Based on a Europa twin-cam chassis, it was developed into the first Esprit prototype, displayed at the 1973 Geneva salon.

It would be another three Read More

1961 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato Re-creation

I doubt whether anybody could tell the difference between this and a
Sanction II without looking at the chassis number

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The competition variant of the legendary Aston Martin DB4, the DB4GT, was introduced in September 1959 at the London Motor Show. It was based on the race-winning prototype DP199/1, which won in its first outing at Silverstone in May 1959 in the hands of Stirling Moss. That was the year Read More

1938 Horch 853 Special Roadster

Though the 853 bears an uncanny resemblance to the legendary Mercedes-Benz 540K, and has a similar output, values lag behind the better-known car

Horch is one of the four companies that merged to form Auto Union, from which the present-day Audi descends. After training as a blacksmith and qualifying as an engineer, August Horch set up in the motor trade in 1899 in Cologne, where his fledgling company started off repairing vehicles. Read More

1997 McLaren F1

The buyer wouldn’t be beaten. He replied “Yo” to each raise of $150,000, all the way to $4 million, winning a lot of affection from the crowd

No ABS. No traction control. No power steering. No airbags. No add-on spoilers. The McLaren F1 didn’t need them. The thinking man’s supercar was conceived in 1988, when McLaren bosses Ron Dennis, Mansour Ojjeh, Creighton Brown, and designer Gordon Murray were discussing production cars in Read More

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