1965 Amphicar 770 Convertible

It’s a car. It’s a boat. Actually, it’s both. Developed in West Germany, the Amphicar was aimed squarely at America’s leisure market and debuted at the 1961 New York Auto Show. As the culmination of a 15-year, $25 million development program, the Amphicar was the creation of amphibious-vehicle pioneer Hans Trippel.

A mid-rear-mounted Triumph Herald 4-cylinder engine was mated to a German Hermes transmission, which directed power to the rear wheels on land Read More

1937 Squire 1½-Liter Drophead Coupe

Adrian Squire was just 21 when he set out to build his own motor car. Dreaming of such a venture since he was a schoolboy, at 16 he sketched out a whole catalog for the “world’s greatest sports car.” He envisioned advanced engineering and light, flowing coachwork sitting on a chassis with a low center of gravity. In many ways, he succeeded beautifully.

At age 18, Squire was apprenticed to Bentley Motors and Read More

1929 Bentley 6½/8 Litre Tourer

This 6½ Litre Le Mans-style tourer offered here was constructed from parts by well-known Bentley collector/racer and VSCC competitor David Llewellyn. The car was upgraded with the engine block from an 8 Litre model.

The car started life fitted with Weymann-type saloon coachwork by H J Mulliner and was first owned by RHR Palmer, of Messrs Huntley & Palmer, the Reading-based biscuit manufacturer.

It was first registered in the U.K. on Read More

1929 Bentley 4½ Litre Dual-Cowl Sports Tourer

By 1926, Bentley saw a need for a new 4-cylinder model. Although a Le Mans winner, the 3 Litre was wanting in international competition, and the standard road cars suffered from increasingly heavy bodies. With the 6½ Litre in production, Bentley sought to combine the light chassis of the 3 Litre with the added power of a larger motor. The result was essentially a 3 Litre chassis with a cut-down, 4-cylinder version of the 6½-liter engine.

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1965 Aston Martin DB5 Coupe

The buyer paid a premium for originality and left-hand drive, and the American collector no doubt carefully picked his moment

Chassis number: DB51847L
Engine number: 4001847

Aston Martin developed and released the all-new DB4 in 1958 alongside the final DB2-derived DB Mark III. The following year, the company received a Royal Warrant of Appointment from HRH Prince Philip and took overall victory at Le Mans and the World Sports Car Constructor’s Championship the year after.

A highly Read More

1968 Jaguar E-type Series 1.5 Roadster

The purest early 3.8s fetch the most money, but this car offered the best of both worlds

Chassis number: 1E2100
Engine number: 7E175478

The first significant upgrade of Jaguar’s sensational E-type sports car occurred in October 1964, with the launch of the 4.2-liter version. Along with the bigger, torquier engine came a more user-friendly gearbox with synchromesh on first gear, and a superior Lockheed brake servo.

Apart from 4.2 badging, the car’s external appearance was unchanged, but under the Read More

1971 AC 428 Fastback Coupe

These cars are rare, as they were slow and costly to build — and they were more expensive than an Aston Martin DB6

Chassis number: CF62

Born on the back of the Cobra two-seat roadsters, AC decided to move up-market and build a larger and altogether more civilized car. They had a fantastic and proven race-bred chassis in the Mk III Shelby Cobra, and their close relationship with both Shelby and Ford ensured an adequate supply of engine and Read More

1959 Jaguar XK 150S 3.8 Roadster

This car was the 63rd XK 150 Roadster built and sold new with optional chrome wire wheels. Special equipment extras included fog lamps, a dual exhaust system and square-pad disc brakes. The engine was fitted with a straight-port “Gold Top” cylinder head, lead and bronze bearings and a lightened flywheel.

Originally supplied by Henley’s Ltd of West Hounslow to the first owner, R.A. Hellmuth, on March 7, 1960, OTS999 was finished in Old English White with a red leather Read More

1958 AC Ace Roadster

One of the most influential and widely imitated classic sports car designs ever is that of the AC Ace roadster—although, of course, much of the world associates its appearance with the later Shelby Cobra derivative, which resulted when the Ace received Ford V8 power and a Carroll Shelby performance makeover in 1962.

The original Ace was itself a derivative. It all began with a one-off sports racer designed by John Tojeiro for driver Cliff Davis in 1952. From the very Read More

1958 AC Ace Roadster

One of the most influential and widely imitated classic sports car designs ever is that of the AC Ace roadster—although, of course, much of the world associates its appearance with the later Shelby Cobra derivative, which resulted when the Ace received Ford V8 power and a Carroll Shelby performance makeover in 1962.

The original Ace was itself a derivative. It all began with a one-off sports racer designed by John Tojeiro for driver Cliff Davis in 1952. From the very Read More