1972 McLaren M8 E/F Can-Am

In 1966, a new form of racing started in the US and Canada. This was the famous Can-Am series, short for the Canadian-American Trophy. John Surtees won the first Can-Am title in a Lola T-70 in 1966 but after this, McLarens in the hands of Bruce McLaren himself and Denny Hulme, ruled the series. Like Lola, McLaren depended for financial survival on selling copies of its winning cars to private customers who would then go have fun in the Read More

1955 Ecurie Ecosse Jaguar D-Type

High-performance automobile manufacturers eager for reputation directed the attention of their most gifted engineers towards the Le Mans GP d’Endurance 24-hours races in the 1950s. Well-

organized, often richly-endowed factory teams battled for supremacy in a series of epic battles. Jaguar’s magnificent legend was built and established at Le Mans where their initial C-type specialized roadsters first won in both 1951 and 1953. For 1954 a far more sophisticated sports racing car was developed and became known as Read More

1960 Austin-Healey 3000 Competition

In preparation for the 1960 Sebring 12-Hours World Championship-qualifying race, the Donald Healey Motor Car Company’s experimental workshop at The Cape, Warwick, transported the 3000 competition coupe to the team’s Sebring base at Murphy’s Garage, Avon Park, Florida. The car offered here, UJB141, carried race number 19 and to aid in the identification from the pits, 141 was painted with a single white racing stripe. On March 26, 1960 John Colgate took the start at 10:00 a.m. in 141 Read More

1929 Bentley Three-Liter Speed Tourer

Designed in 1919, first produced in 1921, and drawing on aero-engine technology, the 3-Liter Bentley is to many, the archetypal vintage sports car. Second, fourth and fifth in the 1922 Tourist Trophy against out-and-out racing cars, first at Le Mans in 1924 and again in 1927. The holder of 24-hour records at over 95 mph, the 3-Liter Bentley is truly a legend. It was built to be a comfortable, user-friendly, road-going sports car that could be raced; a formula Read More

1958 MGA Twin-Cam

For the debut of its new MGA in 1955, MG wisely chose that year’s LeMans 24-hour race; after a succession of open-wheeled models, there were fears of an adverse reaction to such a streamlined car and it was felt that by showing the MGA in competition first the aerodynamic shape would be accepted as a performance essential. There had been some delays, however, in getting the go-ahead for production, MG owner BMC declining, having already agreed with Donald Healey Read More

1989 Mini Moke

he Mini has been the parent to an incredible number of ingenious offspring. None has a larger cult following than the Moke.

In Britain it was introduced as a baby Land Rover, but it was perceived differently in more sunny climes. The Moke wasn’t a baby Land Rover, it was a fun car. It had zip and chic, style and personality. The Moke was not about driving through mud and rounding up sheep, it was about sunshine and Read More

1970 Tyrell-Cosworth Formula 1

This historic 3-liter Formula One car is the original prototype machine that launched the new Tyrrell marque in Autumn 1970. It was designed by Derek Gardner for reigning World Champion driver Jackie Stewart and was commissioned by Ken Tyrrell.

Tyrrell 001 started life as the Tyrrell SP – ‘Secret Project.’ In 1969 Ken Tyrrell’s Equipe Matra International was dominating the World Championship competition with the French Fl cars. But Matra Sports had recently been taken over by the Read More

1961 Jaguar 3.8 XKE Roadster “Flat Floor”

Introduced in 1961, the Jaguar E-Type caused a sensation when it appeared, with instantly classic lines and a 140 mph-plus top speed. The newcomer’s design owed much to that of the racing D-Type: a monocoque tub forming the main structure, while a tubular spaceframe extended forward to support the engine. The latter was the same 3.8-liter unit first offered as an option on the preceding XK150, and the E-Type’s performance did not disappoint; firstly, because it weighed around 500 Read More

1960 AC Greyhound

The proud marque of AC originated in the first decade of the 20th century in Thames Ditton, England.

Always a Sporting Car manufacturer, AC was well known for its AC Ace, AC Aceca and AC Bristol Models in the 1950’s. The latter utilized the BMW derived 2-litre Bristol engine which in Greyhound form was bored to 2.2 litre and developed 125 plus BHP at 4700 RPM.

Essentially the AC Greyhound Read More

1968 Triumph TR5 Roadster

The Triumph TR series is one of the great success stories in the history of the sports car and many would say that the TR5 is the pick of the line. It was a development of the TR4A which, in turn, was based on the TR3A chassis, but with independent rear suspension and styling by Giovanni Michelotti. The TR5 had Triumph’s 2.5-litre straight-six engine which gave 150 bhp and 168 lb/ft torque which translated into 120 mph (0-60 mph Read More

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