1957 MGA 1500 Roadster

A successful outing for three EX182 pre-production prototypes at the Le Mans 24 Hours race in 1955 provided perfect pre-launch publicity for MG’s new sports car. Conceived as a replacement for the traditional T-Series MGs and launched in 1955, the MGA combined a rigid chassis with the Austin-designed, 1489-cc engine that had first appeared in the ZA Magnette.
With over 100,000 produced, the MGA was perhaps the most popular sports car of its time. Its curving lines, with long Read More

1955 Morgan Plus Four DHC

H.F.S. Morgan’s first four-wheeled Morgan, the Standard 10-engined 4/4, appeared in 1936 and formed the mainstay of production until 1950, when it was superseded by the larger and more powerful Standard-Vanguard-engined Plus Four. We are advised that the Morgan Motor Company has confirmed that this example left the factory in December 1954 and retains it original chassis/engine numbers.
Originally sold to a Dr. Allen of Stourbridge and registered “WAE 784,” the car returned to the factory after five years Read More

1962 Aston Martin DB4 Series IV

The Aston Martin DB4 was introduced at the 1958 London Motor Show to great acclaim. Its beautiful yet understated coachwork was by the famed styling house Touring of Milan. Touring utilized the Superleggera process in which aluminum panels were attached to a steel tube frame, the overall effect being that the body was light, yet rigid. The newly designed Tadek Marek DOHC 3.7-liter engine produced an impressive 240 bhp, which propelled the Aston from 0 to 60 in under Read More

1952 Allard J2-X

If hot rods had been invented in England, Sidney Herbert Allard would have been their originator. In 1936 he built a successful trials machine from Ford and Bugatti parts. His 1949 National British Hill Climb Championship came in a loud and fearsome special with four rear wheels powered by a war-surplus V8 Steyr tank engine.

The first postwar production models of the Allard Motor Company, founded in 1946, featured American Ford flathead V8s, more often than not fitted Read More

1960 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk II

There is no mistaking the lines of an Austin-Healey. Perhaps second only to the seductive curves of the Jaguar E-type, the long flowing lines of the front shroud and powerful haunches of the short rear fenders make this car an icon of the golden decades of sports cars. Remarkable is the fact that the lines of the Healey were penned by a 24-year-old designer named Gerry Coker, who had never designed a car before in his career. More remarkable Read More

1961 Lotus Elite S2 Coupe

This “barn discovery” Lotus Elite was first registered on December 14, 1961, according to the duplicate green logbook in its history file. It was owned by Mr. Peter John Gillett of Cobham in 1971 before it was sold to the last owner, Mr. Che Keng Saw, in August 1972. The Lotus was extricated from a garden in Essex by the executors of his estate and delivered for sale.

According to the Elite Club records, it would seem to Read More

1953 Bentley R-Type 4.5-Litre

The first Abbott two-door coupe to grace the R-type chassis made its debut at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show, alongside an equivalent drophead design. The chassis on which these and the fourteen subsequent cars built differed from standard, having a lowered radiator and steering column rake, and carrying a 3.41 rear axle ratio. The Abbott coachwork, of similar design to that of the Mulliner-built Continentals, was penned by Peter Woodgate. It was not until May 1953 that a Read More

1929 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Ascot Phaeton

A direct descendant of the Silver Ghost, the Rolls-Royce Phantom I was launched in May 1925. For the most part, the Phantom I chassis was identical to that of its predecessor. It did offer customers two different wheelbase lengths from which to choose: 143.5 inches or 150.5 inches. The Phantom I’s transmission was also the same as before, except that the old cone clutch was replaced with a new, single dry-plate clutch-more conducive to smoother operation.

It didn’t Read More

1955 Triumph TR2

In the early 1950s, Jaguar and MG defined the postwar sports car market. The TR2 was Triumph’s attempt to share in the spoils of that market against competitors like the Austin-Healey 100, a slightly faster car that was aggressively courting performance enthusiasts.

There never was a Triumph TR1. The TR2 was developed from the prototype “20 TS” introduced at the Earls Court Motor Show in London in October 1952—the same show that saw the debut of the Healey Read More

1960 Austin-Healey 3000 2+2

The Austin-Healey sports car range is synonymous with a particular era of British sports car production, and is similar to Jaguar in many ways. Both companies built strong, reliable and affordable cars for the North American market, their strongest and safest market, and the cars evolved model by model over the years. The 100 series Healeys were successful, initially with four-cylinder, then six-cylinder, motors, but it is the 3000 model that most people remember as the definitive Healey. The Read More

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