1956 Jaguar D-type Roadster

Jaguar’s magnificent legend was enhanced at Le Mans during the 1950s, where their initial C-type specialized roadsters first won the 24 Hour race in both 1951 and 1953. For 1954 a far more sophisticated sports racing car was developed, which became known as the “D-type.” Entered at Le Mans as factory team cars in 1954, the first D-types were only narrowly beaten by a much larger-engined Ferrari V12. Jaguar quickly got their revenge a few weeks later when the Read More

1968 MGC Convertible

By the late 1960s the MGB, now with a 1.8-liter engine, had been in production for five years and was firmly established in the hearts of enthusiasts around the world. Its performance, however, was outpaced by sports models and-on occasion-tuned sedans from other factories. The engineers at MG’s Abingdon works knew there was plenty of development in the B’s compact unitary bodyshell and running gear, and in 1967 the 3-liter MGC-GT and roadster were unveiled at the Earls Court Read More

1963 Morgan Low-Body +4 Super Sport

The Morgan Plus 4 Super Sports model was introduced late in 1961, offering arguably the best price-for-performance value available at that time. Its lightweight aluminum body provided crisp handling in a design reminiscent of the great fully fendered sports cars of the 1930s.

Between 1961 and 1968 only 104 Triumph TR4A-engined aluminum-bodied Super Sports were produced. Of the 95 two-seat cars built for sports car competition in the United States and abroad, 50 carried the low-bodied roadster coachwork Read More

1965 Aston Martin DB5 Convertible

The DB5 convertible may be rightly regarded as the perfected Aston Martin-the product of deliberate and steady improvement in performance,reliability, comfort and appearance to a plane unequalled by its Continental rivals. The DB5 flowed smoothly from the DB4, gaining a small measure of displacement (from 3.7 to 4.0 liters) and power (from 240 to 282 horsepower). Its body flowed even more smoothly, adopting the covered headlights pioneered on the short-wheelbase DB4GT by Zagato and offered on some later DB4GTs. Read More

1930 Bentley 6½-Liter Speed Six

Although the 6½-liter had been conceived as a touring car to compete with Rolls-Royce’s new Phantom, in Speed Six form it proved admirably suited to competition: in 1929 Barnato/Birkin’s Speed Six won the Le Mans 24 Hour race ahead of a trio of 4½-liter Bentleys and Barnato/Kidston repeated the feat in the following year’s Grand Prix d’Endurance at the Sarthe circuit ahead of similarly mounted Clement/Watney. Small wonder, then, that the fast yet refined Speed Six was W. O. Read More

1950 Allard J2 Roadster

An excellent example of a successful Anglo-American hybrid, the J2 Allard offered incredible performance for the period at a moderate cost. As a result, they were very popular in US and European racing and their list of competition successes is most impressive, including first-place finishes at Sebring, Bridgehampton and other race courses throughout America. During the production run of 1950-51 a total of 99 examples were built. Ideal for the now popular runs and rallies throughout this country and Read More

1954 Austin-Healey 100/4 BN1

Considered as the original Austin-Healey, the 100 BN1s and BN2s were built from 1953 to 1956. Equipped with a four-cylinder engine, the 100 BN1 series cars featured a production run exceeding 10,000 units, while only about 4,500 of the later BN2 series cars were produced. Most enthusiasts do not differentiate the two series substantially, as the only noticeable variation on the BN2 was the adoption of a four-speed/overdrive gearbox in lieu of the three-speed/overdrive on the earlier cars.

Fitted Read More

1960 Jaguar XK 150 DHC

Jaguar turned the motoring world upside-down and inside-out when it introduced the XK 120 in 1948. It combined a powerful 160-bhp twin-cam straight-six with the most sensuous body ever seen on a production automobile. The combination of the 120-mph top speed, beauty and value had the celebrities lining up for their copies. Basic specifications called for mating the gorgeous 3.4-liter twin-cam engine to a four-speed Moss gearbox. Front suspension was independent by torsion bars, while the driven solid rear Read More

1951 MG-TD Roadster

World War II saw the start of many romances and among them was the affair between America and Abingdon, where MGs were made. Americans met the MG, fell in love, and pretty soon Abingdon couldn’t keep up with the demand. Like many a love affair, the Smitten One did not notice his Beloved One’s shortcomings. The MG-TC was slow, uncomfortable, and came only with right-hand drive. On the other hand, it had classic looks and was enormous fun on Read More

1959 AC Ace “Cobra” Roadster

The success of Cliff Davis’s successful Tojeiro sports-racer prompted AC Cars to put the design into production in 1954 as the Ace. The Davis car’s pretty Ferrari 166-inspired Barchetta bodywork was retained, as was John Tojeiro’s twin-tube ladder-frame chassis and Cooper-influenced all-independent suspension, but the power unit was AC’s own venerable two-liter long-stroke six.

This overhead-camshaft engine originated in 1919 and, with a modest 80 bhp (later 100 bhp) on tap, endowed the Ace with respectable, if not outstanding, performance. Read More

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