1989 Mini Moke

he Mini has been the parent to an incredible number of ingenious offspring. None has a larger cult following than the Moke.

In Britain it was introduced as a baby Land Rover, but it was perceived differently in more sunny climes. The Moke wasn’t a baby Land Rover, it was a fun car. It had zip and chic, style and personality. The Moke was not about driving through mud and rounding up sheep, it was about sunshine and Read More

1970 Tyrell-Cosworth Formula 1

This historic 3-liter Formula One car is the original prototype machine that launched the new Tyrrell marque in Autumn 1970. It was designed by Derek Gardner for reigning World Champion driver Jackie Stewart and was commissioned by Ken Tyrrell.

Tyrrell 001 started life as the Tyrrell SP – ‘Secret Project.’ In 1969 Ken Tyrrell’s Equipe Matra International was dominating the World Championship competition with the French Fl cars. But Matra Sports had recently been taken over by the Read More

1961 Jaguar 3.8 XKE Roadster “Flat Floor”

Introduced in 1961, the Jaguar E-Type caused a sensation when it appeared, with instantly classic lines and a 140 mph-plus top speed. The newcomer’s design owed much to that of the racing D-Type: a monocoque tub forming the main structure, while a tubular spaceframe extended forward to support the engine. The latter was the same 3.8-liter unit first offered as an option on the preceding XK150, and the E-Type’s performance did not disappoint; firstly, because it weighed around 500 Read More

1960 AC Greyhound

The proud marque of AC originated in the first decade of the 20th century in Thames Ditton, England.

Always a Sporting Car manufacturer, AC was well known for its AC Ace, AC Aceca and AC Bristol Models in the 1950’s. The latter utilized the BMW derived 2-litre Bristol engine which in Greyhound form was bored to 2.2 litre and developed 125 plus BHP at 4700 RPM.

Essentially the AC Greyhound Read More

1968 Triumph TR5 Roadster

The Triumph TR series is one of the great success stories in the history of the sports car and many would say that the TR5 is the pick of the line. It was a development of the TR4A which, in turn, was based on the TR3A chassis, but with independent rear suspension and styling by Giovanni Michelotti. The TR5 had Triumph’s 2.5-litre straight-six engine which gave 150 bhp and 168 lb/ft torque which translated into 120 mph (0-60 mph Read More

1964 Aston Martin DB5

The DB5 Aston Martin rapidly became the very essence of the hand-built English classic car. Very expensive, built in tiny numbers by dedicated craftsmen, it was also an apt choice of mount for the suave secret agent James Bond. Equally deft was the director’s decision in 1995 to hark back 30 years, nostalgically providing a DB5 for Bond’s use in “Goldeneye”.

No less than three different Aston Martins were employed during filming and this fourth example was used Read More

1958 Austin-Healey 100-Six

It was with an Austin-Healey 100-Six in basic production trim that Tommy Wisdom and Cecil Winby won their class in the 1957 Mille Miglia, while three factory entered 100-Sixes went on to take the Manufacturers’ Team Prize at the 1958 Sebring 12 Hour race. The same year saw the first factory rally team of 100-Sixes show real potential, including Pat Moss, sister of Stirling, taking her first Coupe de Dames for a penalty-free run. Shortly afterwards, the first lady Read More

1938 Jaguar SS100 Roadster

In the early ’30s, William Lyons’ design influence began to take its full effect. The Swallow Sidecar Company evolved into Swallow Coachworks with a highly successful line of Lyons-designed bodies, mostly for the Austin Seven and 6-cylinder Wolseley-Hornet. Swallow’s first complete car, the SS-I, based on the Standard (later to become Standard-Triumph) Sixteen (2-liter) and Twenty (2.5-liter) chassis, was introduced in 1931, followed by the SS-II on the Standard Little Nine (1-liter).

SS cars offered value, performance and, Read More

1958 Arnolt Bristol

In 1953, S. H. “Wacky” Arnolt, Chicago businessman and vice-president of Bertone, was in London for the Motor Show. He had already had some success with his Bertone-bodied MG TDs, which had whetted his appetite for sports cars, and he was very impressed b

In 1953, S. H. “Wacky” Arnolt, Chicago businessman and vice-president of Bertone, was in London for the Motor Show. He had already had some success with his Bertone-bodied Read More

1960 Triumph TR3A

In 1957, Triumph introduced the TR3A line. The new TR3A was seen as an improved version of its predecessor, the TR3, in both design and engineering. The sporty new “3A” had formidable speed potential, topping out at over 105 mph. It featured a considerably larger grille complete with its own badging. The wider eggcrate style of the new grille earned it the nickname of “widemouth” from Triumph enthusiasts. The TR3A came equipped with a multitude of options, including wire Read More