1952 Allard J2

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This car was delivered to Allard agents in Dagenham Motors on the 1st of May 1952. Dagenham Motors sold the car to a Mr. R. Ferrari (no relation) of Gunnersbury Lane, London. Mr. Ferrari owned the car, it appears, until 1960 when in February of that year he advertised the car for sale in the Allard Owners’ Club newsletter. The car was sold to a Mr. Moul of Sutton Coldfield, Warwickshire, who joined the Allard Owners’ Club Read More

1960 Aston Martin DB4 Series 2

Intended for the affluent connoisseur, the Aston Martin DB4 made its debut at the 1958 London Show. With its hand-crafted aluminum body and high-output six-cylinder engine, it was a logical development of its DB2 and DB MkIII predecessors.

Aston went to Carrozzeria Touring, the great Italian styling house, to interpret their thoughts for their new shape. Using their famous Superleggera – superlight – tubular structure, Touring created an aesthetic classic, light in appearance and construction alike.

Underneath was Aston Read More

1970 Jaguar E-Type Series II 4.2 Convertible

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To some the Series II E-type represents the best of all worlds. The classic styling and design is unmistakable and recognized as one of the finest roadsters ever built with added design advantages over its Series I predecessor.

These include a new cross-flow radiator with twin electric fans for better engine cooling, bigger Girling-made brakes, collapsible steering column, stronger chrome-plated wire wheels, better clutch with higher-rated diaphragm spring and new camshafts with redesigned profiles to give quieter Read More

1960 Aston Martin DB4 GT

Tractor and gear manufacturer David Brown took over the Aston Martin and Lagonda companies in 1947. His first DB2 series and variants sold well from 1949 to 1958, and served to re-establish the marque as a builder of soundly engineered, quali­ty motor cars.
In 1959 the much-improved DB4 model made its debut. Chief designer Tadek Merak’s new 3.7-litre alloy straight six featured twin overhead cams and hemispherical combus­tion chambers. This engine was installed in a steel platform chassis and Read More

1972 Triumph Stag 4×4

Introduced in the early 1970s, the Triumph Stag was a high-powered gentleman’s tourer and was the first Triumph to be fitted with the in-house produced three-liter V8. The body was designed by Giovanni Michelotti and proved to be such a success that the l

Introduced in the early 1970s, the Triumph Stag was a high-powered gentleman’s tourer and was the first Triumph to be fitted with the in-house produced three-liter V8. The Read More

1967 Lotus 47A Sports Racing Coupe

When Lotus launched its then quite radical mid-engined Europa in 1966 it received lavish praise for its superb roadholding and handling, but was criticized for a lack of power from the Renault 16 engine. A tuned Gordini option was mooted but when Lotus developed the racing Europa Type 47 to contest the Group 4 GT category, it was a Cosworth Lotus-Ford twin cam, the Mk 13C, that supplemented the Renault unit. The twin overhead camshaft, 1,594 cc four-cylinder, allied Read More

1966 Austin Mini Cooper S

Few cars in competition have fueled the imagination like the giant-killing Mini Cooper, the combination of diminutive size, outstanding roadholding and punchy power often running rings around the opposition. Following the original 997 cc Mini Cooper’s launch in July 1961, Pat Moss gave due warning of the car’s potential by winning the 1961 Tulip Rally on only the car’s second outing, and the following year John Love won the British Saloon Car Championship; it was successes like these that Read More

1959 Jaguar XK 150 4.1 Fixed Head Coupe

Jaguar’s new six-cylinder twin overhead camshaft engine was ready by 1948 and launched in the XK 120 sports car which took the motoring world by storm. Some 12,000 XK 120s were subsequently sold. This was succeeded in 1954 by the XK 140 and the final evolution example was the XK 150 in 1957.

This new car with major American influence had lost some of the svelte looks of its predecessors but was more luxurious; the cockpit was larger and Read More

1961 MGA Twin Cam Roadster

For the debut of its new MGA in 1955, MG wisely chose that year’s Le Mans 24 Hour race; after a succession of open-wheeled models there were fears of an adverse reaction to such a streamlined car, and it was felt that by showing the MGA in competition first the aerodynamic shape would be accepted as a performance essential. There had been some delays, however, in getting the go-ahead for production, MG owner BMC declining, having already agreed with Read More

Triumph Stag

The birth of the Triumph Stag came almost by chance after stylist Giovanni Michelotti, already responsible for the Triumph Herald, 200 saloon and TR4 models, borrowed a tired 2000 for the basis of a new show car in 1965; the only proviso was that Triumph would have the first option on the design if it approved. When the company saw the result, a striking two door, four seat convertible, it snapped it up before it went public.

The previous Read More