1962 Porsche 356B T-6 Super 90 Cabriolet

Courtesy of Silverstone Auctions

In September of 1959, Porsche revealed their fully updated 356 known as the 356B. This had a completely revised body that was more suitable for the American market. The 356B used the new T-5 body style, which raised the front and rear bumpers nearly four inches. Furthermore, the headlights were also repositioned higher to meet American regulations. Inside, Porsche fitted a new deep-dish steering wheel and deeper front seats.

New to the model was the Type 616/7 Super 90 engine, Read More

1972 Ferrari 365 GTC/4 Coupe

Tom Wood Photography, courtesy of Bonhams

At the 1971 Geneva Salon de L’Automobile exhibition, Ferrari launched another new model. This was the GTC/4 as offered here, which was presented as a more sober and discreet alternative to the blisteringly high-performance Daytona. But the GTC/4 was really more closely related to the 365 GT 2+2, which it had replaced on the Pininfarina assembly line.

The GTC/4 had two small rear seats tailored for small children or perhaps for short-distance use by one adult, sitting across the car. Read More

1905 Fiat 60 HP 5-Passenger Tourer

Teddy Pieper ©2013, courtesy of RM Auctions

According to the Registro Storico Fiat, chassis 3003 was accepted on June 7, 1905, by Fiat’s sole American importer, Hollander and Tangeman of New York City. It was the third of only 20 examples of the 4-cylinder 60 HP built on the 2,985-millimeter wheelbase chassis (the shorter of two offerings for the model), and it is the only example known to survive today.

The car was fitted at the Turin factory with upgraded racing sprockets and a unique clutch that Read More

The Best Kadett of All

Courtesy of Barrett-Jackson

Ask any American to name an Opel product, and they’re overwhelmingly likely to name the GT — often known as the “Baby Corvette” that arrived in America in 1969.

But few could tell you that General Motors bought most of Opel in 1929 — and took complete ownership in 1931. By the end of the 1930s, Opel was the second-biggest automaker in Germany. Relations with the parent corporation were severed during the World War II years, but after 1945, Opel Read More

1970 Range Rover

Courtesy of Silverstone Auctions

The original Spen King-designed Range Rover was one of the British motor industry’s proudest success stories. When it went out of production at the end of 1996, it still looked as fresh and forward-thinking as it did back in 1970, when one was chosen for an exhibit in the Louvre as an example of modern sculpture.

The car was renamed the Range Rover Classic when the Mk II model was introduced in the autumn of 1994, but demand continued even Read More

1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA

Courtesy of Bonhams

Introduced in 1965, the GTA — the A stood for Alleggerita (lightened) — was the official competition version of the Giulia Sprint GT, and it was produced in both road and race variants. The latter, as usual, was the responsibility of the factory’s Autodelta competitions department, which had been founded in 1961 as an independent company by Carlo Chiti and Ludovico Chizzola, and subsequently absorbed by Alfa Romeo.

Visually almost indistinguishable from the road-going Sprint GT, the GTA differed by Read More

1930 Cadillac V16 Roadster

On January 4, 1930, Cadillac stunned the fine-car market at the New York Auto Show with the introduction of its breathtaking new V16. With it, Cadillac instantly catapulted itself to the head of the luxury class in one brilliant stroke. Until then, only Bugatti had produced a 16-cylinder engine, and it was accomplished by bolting two 8-cylinder inline engines together, which was an innovation that was originally intended for aircraft use.

Cadillac’s V16 was the first true 16-cylinder engine to Read More

1984 Ferrari 512 BBi Berlinetta Boxer

Tom Wood ©2014, courtesy of RM Auctions

When introduced at the 1981 Frankfurt Salon, the 512 BBi brought about only minor changes from the outgoing 512 BB, with the chief among those being the addition of a Bosch K-Jetronic fuel-injection system. The BBi retained all of the 512 BB’s looks and character — but added exposed driving lights on the nose and rectangular parking lights adjacent to the exhausts at the rear. For many clients, the addition of the fuel injection was a welcome change, and the Read More

1954 Pegaso Z-102 Cabriolet

Chip Riegel, courtesy of Gooding & Company

That Spanish truck manufacturer ENASA should have built one of the most exotic sports grand touring cars of the early 1950s seems rather improbable. However, it becomes somewhat more understandable when you learn that the company’s chief technical manager’s last position was Chief Engineer, Special Projects, for Alfa Romeo from 1936 to 1944. Wifredo Ricart was often criticized for the complexity of the vehicles he designed, but in the case of the Pegaso sports car, that attribute was very much Read More

Coulda, Woulda, Shoulda

Here at SCM, we take some space in every issue to look at affordable classics — great cars that you can get into without emptying your wallet. Affordable classics are great because they’re far more engaging than the average new grocery-getter, and you can drive them without worrying yourself to death about miles, damage and insane repair bills.

But here’s one true fact: Affordable classics don’t always stay affordable. Whether this is a good or bad thing mainly depends on Read More

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