1972 Maserati Boomerang Coupe

Courtesy of Bonhams

First seen as a concept car at the Turin Motor Show in 1971, the Maserati Boomerang was a typically adventurous work by Giorgetto Giugiaro.

The Boomerang borrowed its mechanical underpinnings and 4.7-liter V8 engine from the recently introduced Maserati Bora coupé, the Italian firm’s first mid-engined production car. With 310 hp on tap, the Boomerang was good for a top speed of around 300 km/h, and as one journalist observed, looked like it was doing 100 mph even when standing Read More

1962 Ferrari 250 GTE Series II 2+2 Coupe

Although several special-order 2+2s had been produced in the 1950s, the 250 GTE was Ferrari’s first true production 2+2, and it enabled them to widen their potential market and compete directly with Aston Martin, Maserati and Facel Vega. The new 2+2 would bring for the first time wide-scale production, with 953 examples in total, across three model variants, being produced between 1960 and 1963. It is widely recognized that fewer than half of the original GTE models have survived, as Read More

1968 Triumph TR5 Roadster

Similar to the preceding TR4A — the first TR with independent rear suspension — but with Triumph’s 2.5-liter, 6-cylinder engine installed in place of the old 2.1-liter four, the TR5 was produced during the 1968 model year only (October 1967 to November 1968) pending the arrival of the restyled TR6.

The bulk of production was built in TR250 export trim, with twin Stromberg carburetors to meet U.S. emissions requirements and a reduced power output of 105 hp. U.K. models came Read More

1988 Porsche 930 “Slantnose” Coupe

Courtesy of Auctions America

Styling for the “Slantnose” 911 Turbo came from the legendary Porsche 935 race car. This factory option was executed on the raw body shell, allowing Porsche’s anti-corrosion warranty to be retained. Included in the price of $23,244 were sloped front fenders, retractable headlamps and air vents to ensure efficient cooling for the brakes and engine. Mechanicals, including the 3.3-liter engine and 4-speed transmission, are identical to regular production Turbos of the era.

Finished in Nougat Brown Metallic with a Mahogany Read More

1963 Lotus Super Seven Series 2 1500 Cosworth

Courtesy of Silverstone Auctions

The Lotus Seven is a small, simple, lightweight two-seater open-top sports car produced by Lotus Cars (initially called Lotus Engineering) between 1957 and 1972. It was designed by Lotus founder Colin Chapman, and has been considered the embodiment of the Lotus philosophy of performance through low weight and simplicity. The original model was highly successful, with more than 2,500 cars sold, partly because of its attraction as a road-legal car that could be used for Clubmans racing, but mainly because Read More

1972 BMW 3.0 CSL

Scott Nidermaier, courtesy of Bonhams

The early 1970s were landmark years for BMW, for not only did the German manufacturer power Jean-Pierre Jarier to the European Formula 2 Championship, it also captured the European Touring Car Championship using one of the most iconic racing saloons of modern times: the 3.0 CSL, known popularly as the Batmobile.

BMW had returned to 6-cylinder power for its range-topping models in 1968 with the launch of the 2500 and 2800 saloons. Also new was the 3.0 CSL’s forerunner, the Read More

1955 Lancia Aurelia B24 S Spider America

Pawel Litwinski, courtesy of Bonhams

This B24 S Spider America had been ordered new by the West Coast Lancia distributor, the now-legendary Kjell Qvale, to be sold out of his San Francisco-based British Motor Car distributorship. Qvale is believed to have sold chassis 1138 to one of the top managers in his organization, Mr. Robert G. Gillespie.

Smart businessmen, both Qvale and Gillespie understood the meaning of the term “Win on Sunday, sell on Monday,” and realized that entering the rare Lancia Spider in sports Read More

1927 Bentley 6½ Litre Le Mans Sports

As with all great W.O. Bentley-era cars, the legendary 6½ Litre owes its existence to the original 3-liter design. Racing success, including the 1924 and 1927 Le Mans wins, quickly drove sales, with buyers soon demanding ever-more luxurious and heavy custom coachwork, resulting in the more powerful 4½ Litre, which in modified form earned Bentley’s third Le Mans win in 1928. While Tim Birkin famously created the supercharged 4½ Litre Blower Bentley, the Works’ own uprated 6½ Litre Speed Six Read More

1982 Porsche 956

Mathieu Heurtault, courtesy of Gooding & Company

The history of 956003, and the Porsche 956 program at large, can be tracked back to 1981. That year, the FIA began to roll out regulations for its new Group C category for sports car racing, designed to replace both Group 5 (closed touring prototypes like the 935) and Group 6 (open sports car prototypes like the 936) for the 1982 racing season. Porsche immediately responded to the challenge and set to work designing a completely new car that could Read More