1961 Porsche RS 61 Sports Racing Spyder

The factory figured on 120 man-hours to create one of these engines. Setting the cam timing took between eight and 15 hours.

Porsche’s giant-killer Spyder series of four-cylinder, four-cam sports racing cars ruled small bore international racing for a full decade, beginning in the early 1950s. Since a powerful multi-cylinder engine was not available, Porsche’s racing car designers concentrated on “free horsepower” in the form of lightweight chassis and running gear fitted Read More

1965 Alfa Romeo TZ-1

Alain de Cadenet explained to me a few years back that he bought his first Ferrari GTO because he couldn’t afford the TZ-1 he really wanted

Alfa Romeo replaced the Giulietta in 1962 with the Giulia range of cars, powered by 1,570 cc engines. In 1963, the company introduced a radical aluminum-bodied Zagato coupe incorporating the Kamm tail coda tronca design from the earlier SZ-2 and a low grille with covered headlights.

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1907 Renault AI 35/45 Vanderbilt Racer

This car was the Ferrari Enzo of its day-exclusive, fast, beautiful,
and exciting-but not really a racer

Renault’s reputation was made in the open-road races of Europe at the turn of the 20th century, in cars built and driven by Louis Renault and his brother Marcel. Even though Marcel was killed in the 1903 Paris-Madrid race and Louis quit racing, the company itself only took a year off.

Competition was the Read More

1963-64 Lola-Chevrolet Mk 6 GT

This stunningly beautiful car represents the beginning of the modern GT and will be extremely competitive in high-level vintage racing

His groundbreaking Anglo-American competition coupe, with its two sisters, marked one of the most significant landmarks in the entire history of world-class endurance racing. This rear-engined Lola GT is the second sister of the original Lola-Ford Mark 6 GT, which competed at Le Mans in 1963.

That car’s evident potential persuaded Read More

1927 Bugatti Type 35C

I can personally attest that it’s possible to sit for hours contemplating the Type 35 like a piece of sculpture

There were 23 automobiles on the starting grid for the 1930 Monaco Grand Prix. Fourteen of them-60% of the field-were Bugattis. Bugattis were essentially graceful machines that emphasized light weight and great road holding over power. Their attributes made mediocre drivers feel good and turned great drivers into giants.

The Type 35 Read More

1956 Jaguar D-type

This gently patinated, tastefully restored 1956 Jaguar D-type sports racing car exemplifies all that was most impressive, most innovative-and perhaps above all most beautiful-about the legendary British manufacturer’s mid-’50s design. The immortal D-type survives today as the supreme example of semi-monocoque frontier technology. After three Le Mans wins in 1955, ’56, and ’57, it was only eliminated by the change to a three-liter engine in 1958.

1993 Williams-Renault FW15C

ABS brought the realization that it was possible to allow computing power to do far more than keep the wheels from locking

World Champion Alain Prost once described the Williams-Renault FW15C, as “really a little Airbus” -his way of describing an F1 car in the electronic era.

Prost campaigned seven grands prix in the 1993 season, from Germany to Australia. He won the German grand prix where S/N 005 debuted. It Read More

1968 Howmet Turbine

Much of the experimental engine is missing. Only ten were built, to win a government contract, so replacement parts are on intergalactic backorder

Throughout the past century of automotive progress, the turbine engine was perceived as a possible alternative to the internal combustion engine.
The two most famous American turbine programs are the Chrysler Turbine and the Andy Granatelli Paxton-STP Indy racers. Yet, the most successful and only race-winning turbine cars Read More

1963 Cobra 289 Le Mans

The engine and transmission Shelby dropped into the car were as exotic as corn dogs at a state fair

Carroll Shelby’s concept was simple enough. Take the attractive, lightweight, well-proven Ace roadster built by AC Cars and turn it into a world-beating production racer by the simple expedient of replacing its aging six-cylinder engines with a powerful and reliable American engine.
At least that was the plan. In practice the Ford’s greater Read More

1965 Shelby GT350 R

Race cars have always been weapons for a battle, complex mechanisms that allowed talented humans to compete for pleasure and glory

It is impossible to define a Shelby GT350 R any better than the Shelby American Automobile Club’s 1997 Registry does.
“The competition model was the car the GT350 started out to be. Unlike any other production car, from which racing versions are made by modifying street versions, the street Read More