1953 Cadillac Series 62 Coupe by Ghia

Admiring the car offered here, one would be hard-pressed to guess its origins as anything but Alfa Romeo in the early 1950s. Only its very American size and presence belie its roots, as do the subtle Cadillac script and badging.

Underneath its design, the creation of Ghia principal Luigi Segre is the same Series 62 that the average neighborhood banker drove to work in 1953. Such is the power of a coachbuilder to make over a car’s entire personality, transforming Read More

1960 Chrysler 300F Hard Top

Road & Track magazine called out the Chrysler “letter cars” as being a very significant automobile. They stressed to their European-favoring readers that it was not a sports car, but it was the best that Detroit had to offer in its luxury “sedan class.” They succinctly summed up an evaluation as “an athletic, but lovable Amazon.”

All of Chrysler’s 1960 cars were built with frameless, unibody construction, and the 300F got a complete makeover. The new F rode on a Read More

1933 Cadillac Series 355 Roadster

Offered here to the discriminating collector of fine luxury cars is a Cadillac that has splendor, luxury, and rarity all in the same package. In fact, this 1933 Series 355 Cadillac Roadster is number two of only three V8 roadsters produced — and the only one in existence today. It presents in the present day just as it did from the factory back in 1933. It still retains all of its original body and fenders, and also is a nicely Read More

1927 Falcon-Knight Model 10 Speedster

This 1927 Falcon-Knight Model 10 has a one-off 2-seat speedster body believed to have been commissioned by James Harvey Howe III, grandson of the inventor of Tums. He donated it to the St. Louis Museum of Transportation in the 1970s. The car was later part of the John O’Quinn Collection before being acquired by the Evergreen Collection.

The body is as elemental as a good speedster should be, light in weight and burdened with only essential features, such as electric Read More

1935 Packard Twelve Sport Coupe

Packard’s most beautiful automobiles of the 1930s were arguably produced as part of the Eleventh Series, and they boasted the first gentle hints of streamlining, such as a slightly angled radiator shell, more deeply skirted fenders, and vee’d headlamp lenses. The 12-cylinder models of this series were the ultimate Packards, and the ultimate of the ultimate were the versions designed by Alexis de Sakhnoffsky and built by LeBaron of Detroit. These scarce cars featured the latest in aerodynamics, including separate, Read More

1940 Oldsmobile Dynamic Series 70 Woodie Wagon

In 1941, the station wagon body was only offered by Oldsmobile on the bottom-of-the-line Special 60 Series. Sharing its wheelbase and dimensions with the Chevrolet Special Deluxe Wagon, it offered the brand engineering for which GM was famous.

As was the standard practice then, coachbuilding for special models such as the labor-intensive wagons was contracted out to outside body companies. One such company was Mid-State Body Company in Waterloo, NY, which had been building custom commercial bodies, including special wagons, Read More

1937 Cord 812 Supercharged Phaeton

One of the few automobiles deemed worthy of inclusion in the Museum of Modern Art in New York — and arguably the most easily recognized American car of all time — the Cord 810 debuted in November 1935, receiving a rapturous reception at U.S. automobile shows. The work of a team led by Duesenberg designer Gordon Buehrig, the 810 body style, with louvered “coffin” nose, streamlined, spat-shaped wings and absence of running boards, would prove immensely influential. Its distinctive features Read More

1954 Pontiac Bonneville Special Motorama Concept Car

It’s said that Harley Earl, director of GM styling, got the idea for a GM concept car while watching world speed records being set at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah. It would be a sports racer called a Bonneville Special. That was when 1954 models were being readied for production, and no GM car had ever carried the Bonneville name.

Perhaps Harley Earl gave the assignment to Pontiac as the birth of its upcoming performance image. Under the direction Read More

1958 Lincoln Continental Mark III Convertible

The 1958–60 Lincolns and Lincoln Continentals were the most massive American passenger cars produced since World War II, as they were built on a 131-inch wheelbase and had an overall length of 229 inches. The Mark III convertible tips the scales at an impressive 4,928 pounds, and only 3,048 were produced.

This stunning Mark III Continental received a nut-and-bolt restoration about a dozen years ago and has been driven very little since. The Matador Red paint is complemented by a Read More

1930 Cadillac V16 Roadster

On January 4, 1930, Cadillac stunned the fine-car market at the New York Auto Show with the introduction of its breathtaking new V16. With it, Cadillac instantly catapulted itself to the head of the luxury class in one brilliant stroke. Until then, only Bugatti had produced a 16-cylinder engine, and it was accomplished by bolting two 8-cylinder inline engines together, which was an innovation that was originally intended for aircraft use.

Cadillac’s V16 was the first true 16-cylinder engine to Read More