1950 Nash-Healey Roadster

What emerged from this two-year restoration process is nothing short of remarkable — Donald Healey’s own Nash-Healey, exactly as he built it, with no expense spared to ensure 100% historical accuracy. Restored by Tsikuris Classics — under the supervision by noted authority Bill Emerson. All major components are original to this car. With ownership history that begins with Donald Healey himself, there is no collection in the world, no matter how grand, that this car will not enhance.

1954 Chrysler GS-1 Special by Ghia

During the 1950s, Italian coachbuilder Ghia built numerous one-off “dream cars” for Chrysler Corporation. One, the slab-sided and extremely modern “Thomas Special,” named for Chrysler export executive C.B. Thomas, was so well received at European shows that a limited run of duplicates was produced for European customers. Others soon followed, including the so-called Ghia Special.

Chrysler’s Export Division had two 1954 Chrysler New Yorker Deluxe chassis, each with a 125.5-inch wheelbase frame, a 235-horsepower Hemi V8, and a PowerFlite automatic Read More

1935 Duesenberg Model SJ Convertible Coupe

As advanced as the Model J Duesenberg was upon its introduction in 1929, most of the technical advancements contained within were confined to the body and chassis. The design of the front end and fenders — as well as that of most coachbuilt bodies — still bowed toward late-1920s convention, albeit stylishly. As a result, by the mid-1930s, the Duesenberg still held mechanical prowess over virtually everything else on the road. From a design standpoint, however, it was looking rather Read More

1955 Hudson Italia

Hudson designer Frank Spring (who left Murphy Coachbuilders in the 1930s to join Hudson) contracted with Carrozzeria Touring of Milan to build 25 production models of his dream sports car.

Touring created a Superleggera coupe with an aluminum unibody built over a steel tub frame. Unique to the Italia were aircraft-style doors, custom bucket seats, Borrani knockoff wheels, air ducts in the body for brake cooling, and triple exhaust pipes that served as stop, brake and backup lights. Each car Read More

1958 Chrysler 300D Convertible

For much of its history, Chrysler was a frontrunner in building some of the most interesting and exciting high-performance cars Detroit had to offer. Foremost among them are the formidable early Hemi-powered Chrysler 300 “letter cars” of the 1950s, which, by virtue of their cost and long list of standard and optional features, were reserved for the wealthiest and most discerning buyers.

Cloaked in handsome Virgil Exner-designed bodies and carefully engineered, the 300 series offered the ultimate in American luxury Read More

1903 Ford Model A Rear Entry Tonneau

The first Ford Motor Company product was called, not surprisingly, the Model A. It was powered by an opposed 2-cylinder engine that displaced 100 cubic inches and developed 8 horsepower. Built on a wheelbase of only 72 inches, it weighed roughly 1,250 pounds, depending upon the body fitted. Its light weight made the most of the engine’s 8 horsepower, and an ordinary man could cover more ground in a day with a Model A Ford than with a horse and Read More

1909 Stanley Model R Roadster

Whoever called this car a Stanley Steamer wasn’t a friend of the Stanley brothers, as they hated that designation. It was a Stanley Steam Car, although Stanley Steamer has become a part of the American language. The brothers were identical twins who went by their initials, F.E. and F.O. They set about building what was, without a doubt, the most famous automobile that used steam power to propel itself down the road. The brothers retired from the company while in Read More

1957 Pontiac Bonneville Convertible

Patterned after other GM luxury specials, Pontiac’s Bonneville convertible was a low-production luxury liner with power to spare.

One of just 630 built, this mostly original 1957 Bonneville shows a believed-actual 53,032 miles. It was in careful storage from 1961 to 1980, when its Kenya Ivory paint and red interior were refinished to as-original condition. Like all Bonnevilles, it is powered by Pontiac’s fuel-injected 347-ci, 310-hp engine and offers leather upholstery, power steering and brakes, Strata-Flight Hydra-Matic, eight-way power seats, Read More

1929 Cord L-29 Special Coupe

The fast rise and eventual collapse of E.L. Cord’s massive industrial empire, with the Auburn, Cord and Duesenberg marques at its core, remains one of corporate America’s most fascinating and tragic stories. From the dramatic turnaround of Auburn in the mid-1920s, which is a textbook case of selective marketing, Cord’s companies manufactured and sold some of the most innovative, stylish and value-rich automobiles ever conceived.

The L-29 Front Drive Cord was developed as Read More

Italian Bicycles Join the Festivities at Concorso Italiano

Many say Italians are at the vanguard of bicycle design and engineering. After all, bicycles have long been associated with Italy, with the oldest bicycle company, Bianchi, originating from Italy in 1885.

This year, Concorso Italiano will host a display for Italian bicycles. Welcoming all Italian bikes, from the early 1900s to current models, attendees are invited to witness the transformation and honing of these non-motorized transporters over the decades.

Concorso Italiano will take place August 17, 2012 from Read More

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