1934/37 MG K3 Magnette Roadster

Determined to extend MG’s racing and record-breaking activities into Class G (1,100 cc), Managing Director Cecil Kimber announced the MG K-series “Magnette” range at the October 1932 London Motor Show. It comprised the roadgoing K1 (four-seater) and K2 (two-seater), as well as the sports racing K3.

Two of the first three production MG K3s finished 1st and 2nd in the 1,100-cc class of the 1933 Mille Miglia. As a result, MG became the first non-Italian manufacturer to be awarded the Read More

1952 Jaguar C-type Roadster

Jaguar’s chief engineer William Heynes said that until he went to the 1950 Le Mans race, he had “never seriously contemplated designing a car for racing.” Then he watched Leslie Johnson push his more or less standard XK 120 as high as 3rd until the clutch failed.

William Lyons watched the race with Heynes, and Johnson’s performance was enough to convince Lyons of the car’s potential: Jaguar was going racing, with the aim to win Le Mans in 1951.

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1924 Bentley 3 Liter Red Label

Any slowdown in Vintage Bentley values due to the current economic climate is likely to push owners toward a cup of tea rather than Valium

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Chassis 356 was the first “Red Label” Bentley produced, and it was this model that was to lay the foundations of Bentley’s financial success. The final specification of the first Red Label, short chassis, Speed Model (generally known in the works as “Speed One”) was Read More

1958 AC Ace Bristol Roadster

Introduced in October 1953, the AC Ace was essentially a reworked version of LOY 500, the handsome John Tojeiro-designed sports racer with which motor trader Cliff Davis had notched up six wins and four seconds that season (in addition to placing 9th overall at the Goodwood Nine Hours).
Lured into collaboration with the Thames Ditton manufacturer by the promise of a £5 ($17.85) per car royalty fee (capped at £500, $1,785), Tojeiro ensured that the new model’s ladder-framed tubular Read More

1958 AC Ace Bristol Roadster

The Ace retains a poise that’s absent from its meatier derivative, offering high-geared steering, enough body roll to orient the driver, and a firm brake pedal

Introduced in October 1953, the AC Ace was essentially a reworked version of LOY 500, the handsome John Tojeiro-designed sports racer with which motor trader Cliff Davis had notched up six wins and four seconds that season (in addition to placing 9th overall at the Goodwood Read More

1970 Aston Martin DB6 Mk II

Two things kept the price down: British buyers are notoriously suspicious of automatics in “sporty” cars; and it was presented on a cheap set of tires

The culmination of Aston Martin’s long-running line of “DB” 6-cylinder sports saloons, the DB6 was introduced in 1965. Aston Martin lengthened the wheelbase by four inches over the DB5 and undertook an extensive restyle, incorporating a more raked windscreen, raised roofline, and reshaped rear quarter windows.

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Ex-Donald Healey 1961 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk II

Graham Robson remembers the car in BMC’s U.K. press fleet, but there’s no mention of Donald Healey having a Mk II as “a personal car”

Introduced in 1961, the Mk II version of Austin-Healey’s highly successful 3000 model was visually distinguished by its vertical radiator grille bars and revised front air intake.

Sharing the same basic chassis design as its predecessor-independent front suspension, live rear axle, and disc/drum brakes-it enjoyed superior Read More

1954 Arnolt-Bristol Bolide

This car had come straight out of a $55,000 restoration and the restorer was on hand on sale day to answer questions, which always helps

Stanley Harold “Wacky” Arnolt made a fortune selling engines and other equipment to the armed forces during WWII. A lifelong motorhead, he set up SH Arnolt, Inc. in Chicago during the late 1940s to distribute MGs and other European imports.

At the 1952 Turin Salon, Arnolt Read More

1939 Jaguar SS 100 3½-Liter Roadster

Any patina has been lost in a slightly over-shiny restoration and repaint, though it does have a big history file and is eligible for many prestige events

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Launched for 1936, the SS 100 was the first real high-performance model produced by SS Cars Limited, and used a new Weslake-developed overhead-valve engine in a shortened SS 1 chassis.

The Swallow Sidecar & Coachbuilding Company had been founded in Blackpool, England, Read More

1932 Daimler 40/50 Double Six Sport Saloon

The long hood is a bit like a padded medieval codpiece

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This 1932 Daimler Double Six 40/50 Sport Saloon is, without question, one of the most imposing automobiles ever constructed by the legendary British marque-or any maker of exclusive luxury vehicles. While only 26 Double Sixes were built over a decade, the vast majority had a smaller displacement and short chassis. Among this rarified group, this 1932 Daimler Double Six Read More