1976 Lotus Esprit S1

Even if the “real”-or “other,” if you prefer-Lotus appeared in most of the
action shots, we can fairly say this car has Bond film provenance

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The Lotus Esprit was unveiled as the Silver Car concept at the Turin Motor Show in November 1972. Based on a Europa twin-cam chassis, it was developed into the first Esprit prototype, displayed at the 1973 Geneva salon.

It would be another three Read More

1961 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato Re-creation

I doubt whether anybody could tell the difference between this and a
Sanction II without looking at the chassis number

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The competition variant of the legendary Aston Martin DB4, the DB4GT, was introduced in September 1959 at the London Motor Show. It was based on the race-winning prototype DP199/1, which won in its first outing at Silverstone in May 1959 in the hands of Stirling Moss. That was the year Read More

1997 McLaren F1

The buyer wouldn’t be beaten. He replied “Yo” to each raise of $150,000, all the way to $4 million, winning a lot of affection from the crowd

No ABS. No traction control. No power steering. No airbags. No add-on spoilers. The McLaren F1 didn’t need them. The thinking man’s supercar was conceived in 1988, when McLaren bosses Ron Dennis, Mansour Ojjeh, Creighton Brown, and designer Gordon Murray were discussing production cars in Read More

1945 Mk XVI Supermarine Spitfire

A Battle of Britain Spitfire Mk I or Mk II would sell for two or three times this sum, and if it had a confirmed combat record, the price could be much higher

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The old engineering adage, “If it looks right, it most probably is right,” describes the Spitfire to perfection.

It still looks gorgeous from any angle, even though it was designed as a war machine. Later models became Read More

1936 Lagonda LG45R Rapide

It always used to come to us in November, to be readied for the Mille Miglia, and it’s a gutsy car that hasn’t been tarted up for Pebble Beach

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Lagonda introduced the 4½-liter M45 at the 1933 London Motor Show. With its overhead-valve 6-cylinder Meadows engine, here was a Lagonda sports car capable of genuinely high performance, even by today’s standards.

For 1935, two additional models were introduced-the 4½-liter Rapide Read More

1955 Jaguar XKD-type Sports Racer

This is the first production D-type, out of long and dedicated ownership,
unspoiled and still in its original form

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XKD 509, the first “production” D off the line in 1955, has a long and interesting history. It was supplied new to New York distributor Chuck Hornburg, who sold it to Albert R. Browne of Menlo Park. At the time, its new price in the U.K. was £2,500 ($6,957).

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1961 Morgan Plus 4

If the buyer plans sedate ice-cream runs with grandkids in the back, four seats might have an advantage

In 1936, the Morgan 4/4 debuted as the company’s first four-wheeled car. The designation 4/4 stood for four cylinders and four wheels. The vehicles that Morgan had produced prior to the 4/4 were three-wheelers with V-twin engines, hence the need to differentiate. Production of the 4/4 continued for over 70 years, except for a Read More

1976 Lagonda V8 Series 1 Saloon

What’s interesting about “007” is that it has been hot-rodded, modernized, and neutered of its ZF 5-speed

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Lagonda had been dormant for a decade when Aston Martin revived the marque in 1974 as the model name for a sensational new four-door sedan based on the existing V8 coupe.

Launched at the London Motor Show in October 1974, the new Lagonda was 305 mm (12″) longer in wheelbase than the Read More

1959 Jaguar XK 150S Roadster

Jaguar people may argue, but I believe the 150’s appeal lies in the “creature comforts” our traveling companions often demand

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Jaguar’s series of XK sports cars established the company’s reputation as a manufacturer of good-looking, fast automobiles sold at a reasonable price. The 1949 launch of the XK 120 caused a sensation and, at the time, its 120 mph top speed established it as the fastest standard production car available. Read More

1960 Jaguar Mk II 3.8 Saloon

Concours restorations can exceed six figures; if you’re very lucky, you might get half of that back when you sell

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“Grace, pace and space” was the Jaguar slogan in the 1960s, and no model epitomized this more than the mid-sized Mk II sedan, which was affordable, elegant and quick. In its ultimate form as the Mk II 3.8, it was termed the “gentleman’s express” and the car of choice for Read More