1961 Triumph TR4

The Triumph TR4 was introduced in 1961 to follow its very successful predecessors, the TR2 and TR3. Code named “Zest” during development, the body was given a more modern and updated appearance by Michelotti, but its drive train and chassis remained the same, using the well-proven 4-cylinder pushrod unit; however, its capacity was increased from 1,991 cc to 2,138 cc.

Handling was improved by a three-inch wider track, and steering was also updated to the more precise rack-and-pinion system. Read More

1959 MGA Twin Cam

Conceived as a replacement for the traditional T-Series MGs and introduced in 1955, the MGA combined a rigid chassis with the Austin-designed, 1,489-cc B-Series engine that had first appeared in the ZA Magnette. Running gear was based on the TF, with independent coil-sprung wishbone front suspension and a live rear axle. Clad in a curvaceous aerodynamic body and capable of topping 95 mph, the MGA proved an instant hit, selling 13,000 cars in its first full year of production.

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1966 Jaguar XKE 2+2 Series 1

If Les Vingt Quatre Heures du Mans has been responsible for the new E-type Jaguar, then that Homeric contest on the Sarthe circuit will have been abundantly justified. Here we have one of the quietest and most flexible cars on the market, capable of whispering along in top gear at 10 mph or leaping into its 150 mph stride on the brief depression of a pedal. A practical touring car, this, with its wide doors and capacious luggage space, Read More

1928 Bentley 4½ Litre Le Mans Sports “Bobtail”

• A two-time factory Le Mans entry

• 2nd Overall at the 1929 Brooklands Double Twelve

• 3rd Overall at the 1929 24 Hours of Le Mans

• The Only Remaining “Bobtail” 4½ Litre

For the 1928 season, Bentley was intent on having new Works cars, all based on the 4½-liter production chassis in addition to Old Mother Gun. The first two cars produced, YV7263 and YW2557, were Works specialized production chassis sent to Vanden Plas for lightweight Le Read More

1954 Bentley R-Type Continental Fastback

To describe this magnificent Bentley R-type Continental, it is difficult to improve upon the typically perceptive and balanced analysis that George Daniels himself wrote of the car for his autobiography All in Good Time — Reflections of a Watchmaker, published in 2000:

“The ease with which the Continental will cover vast distances without discomfort to its occupants is now legendary. It is silent, smooth and spaciously comfortable. At the cool, thin-rimmed steering wheel, one looks along a long, slender Read More

1962 Aston Martin DB4 Vantage Convertible

Classically proportioned and instantly recognizable from the moment of its introduction in 1958, the Touring-styled Aston Martin DB4 established a look that would survive, with only minor revisions, until 1970.

Designed by Tadek Marek and already proven in racing, the DB4’s new twin-cam, 6-cylinder engine displaced 3,670 cc, and the gearbox was a new David Brown 4-speed, all-synchromesh unit.

An immensely strong platform-type chassis, designed by Harold Beach, replaced the preceding DB2/4’s multi-tubular space frame, the latter being considered Read More

1991 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato Sanction II

Of the many models in Aston Martin’s 90-year history, and of the DB series of 6-cylinder cars in particular, the DB4GT Zagato is arguably the best loved and most respected. The original collaboration between Aston Martin and Zagato of Milan resulted in a production run of only 19 constructed between 1961 and 1963, although the factory set aside 23 chassis numbers. It is an indication of the affection felt for these beautiful cars that all 19 are still in Read More

1960 Triumph TR3A Convertible

A solid original New Mexico car with a recent body-off restoration, this Triumph has the factory rear seat. Factory-quality patch panels were used where needed. Priority was placed on originality and drivability. The chrome has been replated, and the interior was completely re-covered with leather seat trim. The full engine rebuild was performed with 87 mm pistons, enlarging displacement to more than 2.1 liters. Internal engine parts have been balanced, and the transmission was rebuilt. Read More

1937 Squire 1½-Liter Drophead Coupe

Adrian Squire was just 21 when he set out to build his own motor car. Dreaming of such a venture since he was a schoolboy, at 16 he sketched out a whole catalog for the “world’s greatest sports car.” He envisioned advanced engineering and light, flowing coachwork sitting on a chassis with a low center of gravity. In many ways, he succeeded beautifully.

At age 18, Squire was apprenticed to Bentley Motors and Read More