1983 Porsche 930 Turbo

The 1976 production year brought the 930 Turbo to North America for the first time. Using developments Porsche had been perfecting for its racing cars, the 930 was the quickest, quietest, and fanciest high-performance street car Porsche had ever offered. It was also the first standard production Porsche to offer a turbo-charged system. Called “a dream car” by the press, it offered spectacular performance for a street car in the early 80s-0-60 mph in 5.3 seconds while pumping out Read More

1927 Mercedes-Benz S/SSK Bitsa

If Thor, the God of Thunder, owned a car it would be a Supercharged Mercedes. Very few cars, before or since, have been so imposing, exclusive, charismatic and simply Wagnerian in conception.

Daimler Benz began development of the supercharged car for road and racing use at an early stage. Starting about 1919, they turned to supercharging in order to gain extra power from the slow-running engines of the period. That they succeeded is shown by a long line Read More

1959 BMW 507 Series II

It would indeed have been a shame if BMW had confined the use of its first V8 engine range merely to its saloon cars of the 1950s. Had that been the case, the world would have been denied what is arguably the Bavarian marque’s finest post-war sports car-the glamorous, high-performance 507.
The V8, the work of BMW chief designer Dr. Fritz Fielder, had first appeared in 2.6-liter form in the 502 saloon of 1954, offering impressive performance and fine Read More

1958 Porsche 356A Cabriolet

Having commenced manufacture with a short run of aluminum-bodied cars built at Gmund, Porsche began volume production of the steel-bodied 356 coupe at its old base in Stuttgart. The work of Ferry Porsche, the 356 was based on the Volkswagen designed by his father. Like the immortal Beetle, the 356 employed a platform-type chassis with rear-mounted, air-cooled engine and torsion bar all-independent suspension. In 1951 a works car finished first in the 1100-cc class at the Le Mans 24-Hour Read More

1935 Mercedes-Benz 500K Drophead Coupe

The merger of Daimler and Benz in the mid 1920s came at a time of acute difficulty for the German motor industry. Competition success such as Rudolf Caracciola’s 1930 European Hillclimb Championship in a supercharged SSK helped sales, which had risen to 6,000 in 1932 from a workforce reduced to 9,000 by the virtual closure of the Benz factories. The addition of smaller cars as commercial vehicles saw output rise to 25,000 in 1935, of which a mere 190 Read More

1953 Mercedes-Benz 300S

Originally introduced in 1951 at the Frankfurt Show, the Mercedes-Benz 300 range was very much a flagship designed to promote the Stuttgart manufacturer as a producer of the finest luxury cars; a design it undoubtedly achieved, ultimately offering imposing and elegant six seater coachwork, in either closed or open form, allied to a smooth and powerful engine, fine road manners and cockpit-adjustable ride height.

Using a separate tubular cruciform chassis, the 300 boasted independent coil spring suspension Read More

1968 Porsche 912

The year after production of the legendary 911 had commenced in 1964, Porsche introduced the similarly bodied 912 as an entry-level model to the prestigious German marque. As such, it shared its monocoque steel chassis with that of the 911, together with independent front torsion bar and trailing arm rear suspension with all-around disc brakes. At the 912’s heart, however, was a 1582-cc flat four-cylinder engine-rather than the 911’s 1991-cc six-cylinder unit-that had last seen service in the final Read More

1970-71 Porsche 917K

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This Porsche 917K coupe is one of the most historic available survivors of this titanic breed. Most significantly, it is one of only five World Championship-level race-winning 917s outside factory ownership.
In 1971, entered by the Martini-Porsche team and co-driven by Vic Elford and Gerard Larrousse, it won America’s most charismatic World Championship-qualifying endurance race: the Sebring 12-Hours.
Why so special? Consider this. Of the 41 works-built Typ 917K and 917LH coupes—four of which appeared under two Read More

1952 Porsche 356 Pre-A Cabriolet

In 1952 there were only four Porsche 356 Cabriolets sold in the United States out of 294 produced by the Porsche Werke in Zuffenhausen. Back in ’51, about the only way to buy a 356 in this country was through New York importer Max Hoffman.

The early cabriolets were among his best-selling cars, helping to give Porsche a foothold in the emerging postwar American sports car market. Today the cabriolets are considered among the most valuable Pre-A models due Read More

1961 Porsche RS61 Spyder

Porsche Spyders are excellent dual-purpose collectibles, equally at home on the track or on road tours such as the Colorado Grand

One of the last 4-cam Spyders built, this tidy RS 61, chassis 718070, possesses a proud racing pedigree, an impressive list of owners, and a degree of authenticity found in few others.

Constructed in the winter of 1960, 718070 first appeared in the hands of one Bob Holbert of Pennsylvania. Read More