1971 Porsche 917/10 Can-Am

Nine seventeen! Two words that spell out the best of the big racing sportscars. Two words that conjure up images of a Pedro Rodriguez Gulf coupe averaging over 160 mph at the formidable Spa-Francorchamps circuit in 1971. Langhecks (longtails), running at over 240 mph down the Mulsanne straight at Le Mans; eleven hundred horsepower unleashed in a bellowing, flame-spitting, turbocharged monster at Laguna Seca in Can-Am. Surely there has never been a more awe-inspiring sports prototype than the Porsche Read More

1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Coupe

Rebuilding after World War II, Daimler-Benz was back on line by 1948, producing the basic 170 and 220 series sedans. In 1951 a more technically advanced 300 series was introduced which represented Mercedes-Benz’s return to the luxury market. The 300 featured all-independent suspension, a four-speed manual gearbox and a three-liter in-line six. With the company now more financially sound, Mercedes decided to return to motor sport competition to regain its image around the world.

Engineer Rudolf Uhlenhaut was Read More

1952 Porsche Type 540 America Roadster

This is an unusual example of a significant, yet somewhat mysterious early Porsche model, the enigmatic Type 540. It has taken decades for marque experts to unravel the numerous questions of the America Roadster, even including such basics as how it came about, who thought of it, and why its production was so brief.

Suffice to point out here that the America Roadster—of which perhaps eleven survive—was the model that began to establish Porsche as a street-useable marque Read More

1967 Porsche 911S SWB 2.0L Coupe

It was evident to Porsche management in the late ’50s that the 356 series was rapidly becoming dated and reaching the end of its development potential, so in 1959 Ferdinand Porsche began designing a new car. A number of criteria were laid down: the car would have no more than a 2,200-mm wheelbase and would carry two adults and two children.

The new model was introduced at the Frankfurt Show in September, 1963. It was a significant advance Read More

1973 Porsche Carrera RSR 2.8

n the early 1970s, the FIA decided sports car racing should use cars that more closely resembled production vehicles. Using the Carrera RS 2.7 as its homologation platform, the 2.8 RSR developed 300 (DIN) hp with the use of a twin-plug ignition, hotter camshafts, higher compression pistons, and many other enhancements.
The car offered here was sold to Bob Hagestad of Denver who used it to take part in IMSA and Trans-Am races including: Road Atlanta Trans-Am, April 15, Read More

1972 Porsche 911E Coupe

The Porsche 911 is one of the most timeless designs in motoring history. This unconventional and charismatic car has evolved at a rapid pace throughout its production life. The 911S was Porsche’s top-of-the-range sporting model throughout the late 1960s and early 1970s, a period when the purest and most desirable versions of the great 911 were produced. Initially available in two-liter guise from July 1966, it boasted a higher fifth gear, anti-roll bars front and rear, Koni shock absorbers Read More

1951 Mercedes-Benz 220 Cabriolet A

Mercedes-Benz recommenced private-car production in 1948, revamping their pre-war Type 170, which had been introduced as long ago as 1931. By 1951 Mercedes appeared to sweep away the austerity of those early post-war years and two new models appeared which made no attempt to be economy models. The cars, which were first shown at Frankfurt, were the 220 and 300.

The 220 was based on a strengthened 170S cruciform chassis with wider track, powered by a new 2.2-liter, Read More

1989 Porsche Carrera Speedster

The six-cylinder boxer engine was a concept originated by Dr. Porsche’s nephew, Ferdinand Piech. Thanks in large part to Piech’s engineering prowess, this aluminum-alloy, air-cooled engine remained a Porsche staple, developing and evolving while remaining true to many of its original design principles. By 1989 the engine had grown from its original 2 liters to 3.2 liters. Power increased proportionally, from 130 hp in 1963 to 231 hp (DIN) by 1989.

Not unlike the engine, many facets of the 911’s Read More

1966 Volkswagon 21-Window Microbus

The boxy Volkswagen Transporter arrived on American shores circa 1949. Using regular Beetle mechanical components, Transporters quickly evolved into mini people carriers.

Dubbed the Microbus, Volkswagen’s unique vehicle became the trademark of a burgeoning hippie counterculture. The combination of economy and practicality made them an instant hit with the flower-power generation. Before long, their slab sides were adorned with Grateful Dead decals and painted flowers.

One of the rarest and most desirable buses built in this era Read More

1956 Porsche 356A Speedster

The first car to carry Ferdinand Porsche’s name was the 356. With aluminum fastback coachwork, pressed-steel chassis and the engine behind the rear axle, manufacture began late in 1948 and the 356 made its debut at the 1949 Geneva Show.

Its power came from a 40 bhp, 1086cc engine mated to a four-speed gearbox, with independent torsion bar/trailing-arm suspension and drum brakes all round. Fuel economy due to good aerodynamics and low weight was excellent. In 1951 1290cc Read More