Columns (1995)

Lola Cars was founded in 1958 by former Quantity Surveyor Eric Broadley, who was located in Huntingdon, England. His first “production car,” the Lola Mark I, was so superior that it immediately made obsolete Colin Chapman’s previously unbeatable Lotus 11s — as well as all Elvas and Coopers. One of Broadley’s most interesting cars was, of course, the Lola Mk 6 GT, which the Ford Motor Company later successfully raced as their GT40. Lola cars have claimed hundreds of victories in the past four decades. Broadley’s early Lolas, beginning with his Mk I and up to and including the Lola…
 1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Berlinetta Chassis 15569 An original sales invoice indicates chassis number 15569 was sold new by Luigi Chinetti Motors to Verby Equipment Company in New York. Ensuing maintenance invoices extending to 1976 demonstrate that Mr. Verby conscientiously serviced his Ferrari at the famous Greenwich importer. Mr. Verby kept the Daytona for close to 30 years and just 27,000 miles before passing it along to a couple of owners. It landed with well-known collector Lawrence Simon in 2007. Mr. Simon submitted the car for judging at the Ferrari Club of America’s International Meet at Corning, NY, in…
Following the debut of the original 4-cylinder Austin-Healey 100 in 1952, and the subsequent change to the 6-cylinder 100-6 in 1956, the British Motor Corporation in 1959 launched the car that would become the defining model of the range: the 3000. As it had a 3-liter engine that could produce 124 horsepower, it was the most powerful “Big Healey” yet, and BMC undertook an ambitious competition program to demonstrate its prowess in circuit racing and in the grueling European road rallies. It is this very model, the two-seat 3000 Mk I, that fired the imagination of sports car enthusiasts around…
BMW 507 Chassis 70134 (Gooding & Co.) Constructed in late 1957, it is believed that this 507 was sold new to the United States through Hoffman Motors of New York. According to the research of marque experts, just 34 examples of BMW’s 507 were officially exported new to the U.S. Over the years, the 507 was a frequent participant in many BMW Vintage and Classic Car Club of America events, taking part in a variety of shows, tours, and special BMW Holidays. Most recently, the 507 made the journey from Colorado to New Mexico, where it was proudly displayed at…
  Many years ago, I was considering buying a Mercedes 230SL and called Mercedes guru, SCM contributor and collector Alex Dearborn to ask for his advice. I told him the car was straight enough, a little scruffy in and out, would need a torn swing-axle boot replaced, had a 4-speed and both tops. At that time, the price of $18,000 was about right. Alex was direct in his response. “How much imperfection can you stand?” he said. “You’ll need to fix anything mechanical that creates safety problems, but after that it’s all up to you.” I decided that if the…
  We recently reported on the status of a lawsuit involving the Briggs Cunningham Corvette, which is ongoing (December 2013, p. 40 and January 2014, p. 42). Domenico M. Idoni, one of the plaintiffs in that case, is now the plaintiff in another lawsuit involving another Corvette, the “Real McCoy.” That’s either bad luck or quite an appetite for litigation! The story is taken from the parties’ court filings. The Real McCoy is a 1956 Chevrolet Corvette SR prototype that Chevrolet built to race. John Fitch ran it in the 1956 12 Hours of Sebring, finishing 1st in class and…
While it is common today to think that the introduction of Jaguar’s new “sporting” model in 1975 was greeted with jeers, the truth is rather different. Certainly the XJ-S (the name carried a hyphen until 1991, when it became the XJS) was a notable departure from the XKE. The nomenclature clearly indicated that it was the top of the XJ sedan line rather than the latest in a line of XK sports cars. Nevertheless, the XJ-S was very much the successor to the XK 150 FHC, a comfortable grand touring coupe that could even be had with an automatic transmission.…
This car is equipped with a 260-hp, 2,999-cc DOHC inline 4-cylinder engine with two Weber 45 DCO/A3 carburetors, a 5-speed manual transaxle, independent front suspension with transverse leaf springs, De Dion rear axle with parallel trailing arms and semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel drum brakes, and a tubular steel frame. This car finished 5th overall at the 1955 12 Hours of Sebring. It raced to multiple 1st-place finishes in other races. Phil Hill and Carroll Shelby raced the car. Marcel Massini documented the history of the car. This car is an early example of Ferrari’s 3-liter, 4-cylinder customer sports/racing cars. It…
Cunningham C-3s have picked up a bit of a tail wind recently, as seen during the Gooding sale at Pebble Beach in 2012, where a yellow coupe sold for $341,000 with commissions. Our subject car, a 1952 Cunningham C-3 Vignale coupe, s/n 5210, sold at Gooding & Company’s Scottsdale auction on January 17, 2014, for $550,000, including buyer’s commission. This tidy appreciation perhaps reflects the car’s role as one alternative to increasingly unaffordable top line collectibles: Ferrari, Mercedes, Porsche and the like. With the Cunningham C-3 Reunion held at Lime Rock last Labor Day weekend — and the simultaneous release…
This Mercedes-Benz 600 is powered by the distinctive M100 6,332-cc overhead-valve V8 engine developed specifically for the Grand 600s. The engine produces 245 horsepower. The car is equipped with a 4-speed automatic transmission; double-wishbone air-spring independent front suspension; swing-axle rear suspension with air springs; and four-wheel, power-assisted hydraulic disc brakes. The car is built on the 600 Pullman wheelbase of 3,900 mm (153.5 inches). The Landaulet Pullmans are considered the “holy grail” for collectors. Making this one even rarer, it is a 6-door model, one of only 26 ever built. This example is being offered for sale publicly for the…