Columns (1871)

When Porsche decided to attach the GT appellation to Carrera in 2004, it marked a return to its competition roots, the new flagship supercar’s looks recalling those of the original Type 550 of 50-plus years ago. Known as “Project Code 80,” the program to develop a front-ranking supercar had begun following Porsche’s Le Mans win with the 911 GT1 in 1998. Although a couple of dozen GT1s were adapted for road use, something more practical would be required for volume production, although it was intended that the GT1’s advanced technology would be carried over to the new model. The first…
For much of its history, Chrysler was a frontrunner in building some of the most interesting and exciting high-performance cars Detroit had to offer. Foremost among them are the formidable early Hemi-powered Chrysler 300 “letter cars” of the 1950s, which, by virtue of their cost and long list of standard and optional features, were reserved for the wealthiest and most discerning buyers. Cloaked in handsome Virgil Exner-designed bodies and carefully engineered, the 300 series offered the ultimate in American luxury and performance. Due to low production and high cost, 1958 was also the last year that the company offered its…
This car appeared on the grid at the 1952 Eifelrennen at the famous Nürburgring complex in Germany. It finished 5th, in the middle of a collection of BMW-powered race cars. This is a unique opportunity to own a contemporary racer to the Veritas racer — and at a comparably bargain price. This example is a “one-off,” totally unique, hand-built race car; the only example extant. The bodywork on the “Wagner Special” was fashioned from surplus U.S. aircraft wing-tanks; the car was built at Honoré Wagner’s uncle’s workshop in Luxembourg. With a clear history, this is a great opportunity for a…
Maranello Motors in England delivered this superb cabriolet to its first owner, an emir of Riyadh in Saudi Arabia. It formed part of a large fleet of vehicles and was rarely used. In 2008, a French industrial company specializing in steel production bought the car, which was kept for special occasions as part of an impressive collection. It is this company that has asked us to sell the car. It has just been inspected by Ferrari — Charles Pozzi in Levallois-Perret, who found no faults. It has covered 19,800 km (12,303 miles) and the bodywork is impeccable, with a flawless…

1961 Triumph TR4

Written by March 2013
The Triumph TR4 was introduced in 1961 to follow its very successful predecessors, the TR2 and TR3. Code named “Zest” during development, the body was given a more modern and updated appearance by Michelotti, but its drive train and chassis remained the same, using the well-proven 4-cylinder pushrod unit; however, its capacity was increased from 1,991 cc to 2,138 cc. Handling was improved by a three-inch wider track, and steering was also updated to the more precise rack-and-pinion system. Internally, the car gained wind-up windows and the new, angular rear end allowed for a boot with a very reasonable luggage…
Based initially at Tours — and from 1906 in Paris —Delahaye built its first automobile in 1894 and soon diversified into commercial vehicle manufacture. Its early products tended to be rather lackluster, but then in 1935 came the first of a new generation that would change the marque’s image forever: the T135 Coupe Des Alpes. A fine sporting car, the T135 was powered by an engine which, although designed for car use, had first appeared in a Delahaye commercial vehicle. The 3.2-liter, 6-cylinder, overhead-valve unit produced 110 horsepower on triple Solex carburetors, while the chassis featured transverse-leaf independent front suspension,…
Okay, it’s March, but we all know that spring is the real start of the car collecting year. And every new year marks the time for self-improvement resolutions. Here are the top seven for the car collector. I won’t buy a car online without seeing it myself Hands down, the most common complaint I get from clients and readers is that they bought a car long distance and, when it arrived, it didn’t turn out to be anything like what they were expecting. The common scenario is that the car looked great in all the low-resolution photos on the web…
The 1950s saw most car manufacturers reaching to sports cars to burnish their image and give a spark to their product lines. This was especially true of European makers eager to get a bigger part of the lucrative U.S. market, where buyers were embracing a more spirited and involving driving experience — even while continuing to buy family sedans.As a result, even Volvo — possibly the most practical carmaker on the planet — launched a limited-production two-seater to join the Corvettes, Thunderbirds, Austin-Healeys and Porsches in American driveways. The P1900, introduced in 1956, had little sporting style and dash, inadequate…

1996 Porsche 911S GT2

Written by February 2013
When Porsche introduced the new 993 in 1995, it was to be the last of the great air-cooled 911s. The new coupe retained only the roof and front deck lid from the preceding 964 model. New items included bodywork, poly-ellipsoid low-beam and variable-focus high-beam headlights, and a 6-speed transmission. A new multi-link rear suspension carried upper and lower A-arms with transverse links. Both the front and rear sub-frames were now so strong that if they were bent in a crash they had to be replaced — they could not be straightened. There were new wheels, and the brake discs and…
The first Ford Motor Company product was called, not surprisingly, the Model A. It was powered by an opposed 2-cylinder engine that displaced 100 cubic inches and developed 8 horsepower. Built on a wheelbase of only 72 inches, it weighed roughly 1,250 pounds, depending upon the body fitted. Its light weight made the most of the engine’s 8 horsepower, and an ordinary man could cover more ground in a day with a Model A Ford than with a horse and buggy. More importantly, the Ford didn’t need to be fed on days it wasn’t being used — or have its…