1963 Aston Martin DB4GT

It was the last standard-bodied DB4GT produced-cool beans. The first or last always generates more buzz and is a nice fact for collectors

Introduced in September 1959 as a higher-performance version of the DB4, the DB4GT took the already-powerful (240 hp) DB4 engine, added twin ignition from two distributors/coils and twelve small (10 mm) spark plugs, three twin-choke Weber carburetors, and an increased compression ratio to boost the power to an honest Read More

1958 Austin-Healey “Bugeye” Sprite

In careful hands a Sprite could return 40 mpg-but not many did. Healthy survivors are scarce

The meticulous restoration of the 1958 “Bugeye” Sprite offered here has been the subject of newspaper and magazine articles in the U.S. and the U.K.

“Here’s a new twist to a timeless tale. A group of high school students pool their money to buy a car, it needs some work.but hey, how hard can it Read More

1954 Morgan Plus 4 Drophead Coupe

The drophead top doesn’t compress very well, and in the “down” position often gives the appearance of a car packing a mattress

HF. S. Morgan couldn’t have guessed back in 1910 that the DNA of his first trike would form the basis of generations of Morgan sports cars. Or that the appeal would extend from pre-WWI owners to more worldly men and women nearly a century later.

More sophisticated enthusiasts might Read More

1964 Ford Lotus Cortina Special Equipment

Dynamically, the transformation wrought by Lotus was amazing. On a twisty road, the dumpy little Cortina could shame cars costing four times as much

Of the 2,894 Mk 1 Lotus Cortinas produced, only 64 were built by the factory as Special Equipment models. This rare version was upgraded with semi-race camshafts, larger valves, bigger diameter exhaust system, 115 hp (up-rated from 105) as indicated by green cam covers, adjustable rear dampers, leather-covered Read More

1925 Rolls-Royce WWI Armored Car Replica

Bonhams exhibited British understatement when it said, “Prospective buyers are advised not to rely heavily on the front brakes, which are not connected”

Once described by Lawrence of Arabia as “above rubies in the desert,” Rolls-Royce’s WWI armored cars proved to be astonishingly durable. But a mandate from the British Government did what the Empire’s enemies couldn’t and the last was scrapped in 1944. There are no survivors, but an accurate replica Read More

1962 MGA 1600 MK II Roadster

The vendor commissioned the restoration over three years to exacting
standards, then only ran it to log a few break-in miles. Why?

With the arrival of the MGA roadster in 1955, many MG aficionados were taken aback by the fact that the pre-war look of the company’s sports cars had been tampered with. The new MGA had a streamlined, aerodynamic body right up-to-the-minute in terms of styling and design. In addition, Read More

1929 Bentley Speed Six Cadogan 4-Seater

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At the end of World War I, Walter Owen Bentley gathered a small group of dedicated and skilled artisans to create Bentley Motors. The first Bentleys appeared in 1919, a group of three experimental 3-liter cars. In the following decade, the 3-liter gave way to the 4 1/2-liter, the 6 1/2-liter, the Speed Six, the 8-liter, the supercharged 4 1/2, and finally the subdued 4-liter.

The 6 1/2-liter Bentley was introduced in 1926, but work soon began Read More

1938 Aston Martin 15/98 Short-Chassis

A pre-war sports car requires more skill and nerve than newer machinery, but the rewards can be enjoyable at speeds just over the legal limit

By the mid-1930s, Aston Martin was one of the most admired British sporting makes. Solidly engineered, low-built,1.5-liter sports-racers took the team prize in the 1934 Tourist Trophy race in Ulster, followed by an impressive third in the 1935 Le Mans 24 hours.

But if the company were Read More

1967 Austin-Healey 3000

Two years ago, $60,000 would have been a good price for this concours-winning BJ8. By waiting, the seller’s return increased by more than 50%

The new Austin-Healey went into production in 1953 and was immediately popular in the U.S. The cars were well-styled, inexpensive, rugged and above all easy to drive, for both the sports car enthusiast who fancied some light competition or just for tooling down to the shops.
The early Read More

1963 Triumph TR4

It sold for $97,200 because someone decided that it was worth it to him or her. That’s it. Period. End of story

This Triumph TR4 is a two-year, frame-off restoration. Everything on this vehicle is new or rebuilt, including the engine, transmission and overdrive, rear axle, front and rear suspension, brakes, and new electrical components and wiring, five stainless 60-spoke Dunlop wheels with radial tires, and original bumpers with new chrome. Read More