1973 Datsun 240Z

Few realize the roots of Nissan reach back to 1912, when a young man named Masujiro Hashimoto created a car. The car was named DAT, after three family member’s initials. By 1934, the cars were Datsuns and the company was Nissan. By the late 1950s, Yuraka Katayama, a young engineer educated in America, advocated both the use of racing to develop the breed and the idea of a car designed for the very different roads and drivers in America.

Katayama Read More

1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 Fastback

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Described by the seller on eBay Motors:
This is a well documented, southwest all its life, no rust ever, older restoration (14 years) Boss with the potential to be made into a show car.

This Boss is solid as a “new dime” and was sold new in Scottsdale, Arizona. It then migrated to southern California, and there it remained until its restoration, beginning with an engine rebuild in 1988. It has seen very little use since. I have Read More

2001 BMW Z8

As BMW’s Web site proclaims: “The Z8 is the stuff that dreams are made of: an engine that is nothing less than a work of art, encased in a brilliantly designed aluminum spaceframe and open to the heavens. The Z8 is a two-seater sports car in the tradition of the legendary BMW cars of the 20th century. It’s a classic based on the essential principles of car design, made with the best engineering on earth and the finest technology Read More

1968-69 Dodge Dart

Veterans of the ’60s remember the Dart for plenty of reasons, most of them related to its economy-car status. The 225-c.i. “slant six” motor, named for its pronounced lean to the port side of the car, was known as the motor that thrived on abuse-it never seemed to need any attention to keep it running. The slant-six Darts were practical cars owned by practical people and used as reliable, affordable transportation.
The Dart jumped into the muscle car race Read More

1981 Ferrari 308 GTBi

The advent of the new Pininfarina-designed 308 GTB was hailed as one of the best Ferraris of modern times. And it is no wonder-following on the heels of the mechanically inspired but visually challenged 308 GT4, the new 308 was drop-dead gorgeous.

As Sergio Pininfarina himself pointed out, “Every Ferrari car previously designed by us was a great success in the market.” From a styling point of view, the 308 owes more to the legendary 246 Dino than Read More

1970 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 Rally Sport

Introduced to compete against Ford’s popular and youth-oriented Mustang in 1967, the Camaro’s brawny good looks and high-performance options resulted in an immediate sales success. Building on this, Chevrolet debuted a completely redesigned second breed of Camaro on February 26, 1970, that was aimed to be “the Corvette for everyday use.”

Supported by a new chassis, the Camaro was longer, lower and wider than its predecessor. An angular front end replaced the well-known bumblebee nose, while leaner doors Read More

1966 Ford GT40 Mk I

The failed merger in 1963 between Ford and Ferrari and the subsequent return to competition motorsport at the highest level by the American company is motoring lore. After their rejection by Ferrari, Lee Iacocca and Leo Bebee formed Ford Advanced Vehicles and went shopping for a Le Mans winner. Following their visit to Eric Broadley’s business in England, they knew they had the basis for a winning car for international long-distance road racing. The resultant car was unveiled in Read More

1972 Lamborghini Miura SV

Rock-and-roll star Rod Stewart was no stranger to the Lamborghini Miura, the world’s first mid-engined supercar-he has owned both a Miura S and SV. When he ordered the right-hand drive SV shown here, he specified a bright yellow finish with dark blue leather upholstery. He also ordered air conditioning, which was relatively novel on a GT car, and a Philips radio/cassette with a recording function.

Only 142 SVs were made, nine of which were right-hand-drive. Stewart kept Read More

1965 Volkswagen 21-Window Deluxe Micro Bus

When the boxy Volkswagen Transporter arrived on American shores in 1949, its effect and influence was immediate. Using standard Beetle components, it was easy to maintain and was one of the best ways to move small groups of people.

Dubbed the “Micro Bus,” Volkswagen’s unique Transporter survived through the decades and evolved into several different vehicles. Its combination of economy and practicality made it a hit with the flower-power generation of the 1960s.

The rarest of the Read More

1997 Ferrari F50

Fifty years of racing, fifty years of winning, fifty years of hard work.” With these words, Luca Montezemolo, head of Ferrari S.p.A., introduced the F50 at the Auto Museum in Geneva, Switzerland, in conjunction with the 63rd annual International Automobile Show, on March 6, 1995.
Using technology from Ferrari’s Formula One V12, the new, normally aspirated 4.7-liter engine featured a crankcase made of nodular cast iron, Nikasil-coated liners and titanium connecting rods. Maximum power was 520 hp at 8,500 Read More