1955 Austin-Healey 100S Sports Racing Two Seater

During the 1950s, the most accessible, most appealing, and in many cases, the most successful club racing car available to any aspiring racing driver was one of the products of the Donald Healey Motor Company’s famous factory at The Cape, Warwick.

This particularly appealing, and in period highly successful, Austin-Healey 100S is a shining example of the type. It has an outstanding record as one of the most successful 100S cars of its period, as it competed in no fewer Read More

Porsche’s Red-Headed Stepchild

Stop for a moment and consider the plight of the Porsche 924. If ever there was a car that was born on the wrong side of the blanket, the 924 is it.

Coming onto the scene as a 1977 model, the 924 was Porsche’s first attempt at a conventional, water-cooled, inline 4-cylinder car. The 924 was created to replace the 914, which had suffered under the stigma of its Volkswagen heritage — the factory couldn’t even manage to put a Read More

1958 Lincoln Continental Mark III Convertible

The 1958–60 Lincolns and Lincoln Continentals were the most massive American passenger cars produced since World War II, as they were built on a 131-inch wheelbase and had an overall length of 229 inches. The Mark III convertible tips the scales at an impressive 4,928 pounds, and only 3,048 were produced.

This stunning Mark III Continental received a nut-and-bolt restoration about a dozen years ago and has been driven very little since. The Matador Red paint is complemented by a Read More

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO

The original, immortal Ferrari 250 GTO had been developed for the FIA GT Championship, duly taking the manufacturer’s title for Ferrari in 1962, 1963 and 1964. So, clearly, any revival of the GTO name could only be permitted for a very special car indeed.

Enter the 288 GTO. Like its illustrious forebear, the 288 GTO (the initials stand for Gran Turismo Omologato) was conceived as a limited-edition model, just 200 units being planned to meet the then-existing Group B homologation Read More

1934 Talbot AV105 “Alpine Racer”

Simply the best. No other phrase better sums up BGH 23. In its day, this was the outstanding British sports touring car.

Georges Roesch’s long line of “Invincible Talbots” needs little introduction to the discerning car connoisseur, and only a combination of poor luck and poor timing meant they never achieved the big-race overall victory which would have made the Talbots from Barlby Road, London, W10, much more widely appreciated.

Talbot competed so widely within their period that BGH 23, Read More

1969 DeTomaso Mangusta

Designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro for Ghia, the DeTomaso Mangusta was first introduced in 1967. Only 401 cars were manufactured until production ceased in 1971, with its successor being the well-known DeTomaso Pantera.

Housing a 289-ci Ford V8, mated to a 5-speed ZF manual transmission, the Mangusta served out over 300 bhp. In standard trim, the specification included all-around disc brakes, four-wheel independent suspension and electric windows — a luxury for a supercar of its time. When opened to reveal the Read More

1964 Austin Mini Cooper 1275 S Competition Saloon

DPE 608B was purchased new by the current vendor on August 12, 1964, from BMC dealer Jackson’s Garages of Godalming, Surrey. The Mini was primarily his road car but was raced whenever the opportunity arose. Early outings included Rufforth and Cadwell Park, both in September 1964, and Goodwood on March 13, 1965 (original program on file).

The Mini then passed through the hands of various other owners. In 2004, the vendor was able to buy it from Gordon Cameron, who Read More

1958 AC Aceca Bristol

1958 Aceca Bristol chassis BEX678

The Aceca Bristol offered here has its original Bristol engine, the number of which matches the car’s original firewall tag. According to the consignor, John Moir, the car’s original owner was Peter Winston, the son of renowned New York City jeweler Harry Winston.

Young Mr. Winston used the car as an everyday driver in Manhattan for some years, after which he sold it through an acquaintance to Tom Hickey, a well-known motorcycle and sports car Read More

1970 Datsun 240Z Series 1

The first Series I cars produced between late 1969 and early 1970 are identified by the fresh-air exhaust vents located on the rear hatch. Datsun quickly realized that they had hit the mark with the modern lines and overhead-cam 6-cylinder that redlined at 7,000 rpm.

Restored to like-new condition, this 240Z is one of the most pristine examples on the market. The only thing this car lacks to be a ZCCA gold-medallion car is the factory wheels and hubcaps, as Read More