1959 MGA Twin-Cam Roadster

Conceived as a replacement for the traditional T-Series MGs and introduced in 1955, the MGA combined a rigid chassis with the Austin-designed, 1,489-cc B-Series engine that had first appeared in the ZA Magnette. Running gear was based on the TF, with independent coil-sprung wishbone front suspension and a live rear axle. Clad in a curvaceous aerodynamic body and capable of topping 95 mph, the MGA proved an instant hit, selling 13,000 cars in its first full year of production.

Immensely Read More

2008 Bugatti Veyron EB 16.4

• 1,001 hp, 7,993-cc quad-turbocharged W16 engine
• 7-speed DSG twin-clutch gearbox
• Haldex four-wheel drive
• Electrically adjustable independent suspension
• 4-wheel carbon-ceramic disc brakes
• Top speed of 253 mph
• Number 100 of 300 built
• One owner from new and less than 700 km from
new
• Offered from the Zegwaard Collection

Introduced in 2005, the Bugatti Veyron EB 16V rocketed from rest to 60 mph in Read More

1909 Stanley Model R Roadster

Whoever called this car a Stanley Steamer wasn’t a friend of the Stanley brothers, as they hated that designation. It was a Stanley Steam Car, although Stanley Steamer has become a part of the American language. The brothers were identical twins who went by their initials, F.E. and F.O. They set about building what was, without a doubt, the most famous automobile that used steam power to propel itself down the road. The brothers retired from the company while in Read More

1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spyder Conversion

The ultimate expression of Ferrari’s fabulous line of V12 sports cars, the 365 GTB/4 “Daytona” was the world’s fastest production car at the time of its launch. Capable of over 170 mph, it is surely destined to remain a front-ranking supercar for the foreseeable future.

Although there had been no official open-top version of its predecessor, the favorable reception of Luigi Chinetti’s 275 GTB-based NART Spyder no doubt influenced Ferrari’s decision to produce a convertible Daytona. Again the work Read More

Five Investments in Cheap Fun

We live in a Golden Age of classic cars. There are so many choices that selecting your first or next classic car has probably never presented as many good options as it does now.
While prices of the blue-chip cars continue to climb to infinity and beyond, we’re also blessed with many good choices at the “affordable” end of the spectrum — what we might call the “white-chip cars.” These are cars that enthusiasts can love, but they won’t make Read More

1955 Aston Martin DB3S Sports Racer

Launched in 1952, the first Aston Martin sports racer was the DB3. Developed for Aston Martin by Eberan von Eberhorst, a former Auto Union racing engineer from the pre-war era, the DB3 featured an all-new, tubular chassis using De Dion rear architecture, with a purposeful, chunky, slab-sided body.

Competition victory proved elusive for the DB3, however, and its performance was hampered by reliability issues. Aston Martin commissioned A.G. “William” Watson to engineer an improved car. In May 1953, a new Read More

1966 Jaguar E-Type Series I 2+2 Coupe

If Les Vingt Quatre Heures du Mans has been responsible for the new E-type Jaguar, then that Homeric contest on the Sarthe circuit will have been abundantly justified. Here we have one of the quietest and most flexible cars on the market, capable of whispering along in top gear at 10 mph or leaping into its 150 mph stride on the brief depression of a pedal. A practical touring car, this, with its wide doors and capacious luggage space, yet Read More

1969 DeTomaso Mangusta Coupe

One of the very first supercars, the Mangusta effectively established DeTomaso as a serious automobile manufacturer on its arrival in 1967. The Mangusta (mongoose) was powered by a mid-mounted 289-ci Ford V8 engine. Also used to power Ford’s GT40 Le Mans challenger, the iconic 289 produced 306 horsepower as installed in the Mangusta, which also used the GT40’s early-type ZF transaxle.

Later Mangusta production used the less-desirable Ford 302-ci engine, producing only 220 horsepower, together with a later ZF Read More

1998 Dodge Viper GTS-R Coupe

Dodge gave its Viper supercar more teeth in the GTS-R, a 700-hp monster that won five FIA GT Championships between 1997 and 2002. In 1998, it became the first American car to win at Le Mans in three decades and the first production-based American car to grace the winner’s circle there.

That same year, Dodge built 100 road-going versions for sale to the public, an impressive example of which is offered here in this all-original, one-owner coupe that shows just Read More