1960 Austin-Healey Bugeye Sprite

Restored Bugeye finished in British Racing Green with new black interior and new black top. Mechanical upgrades include a fresh rebuilt 1,275-cc motor, disc brakes, aluminum flywheel, aluminum radiator, dual SU carburetors, free-flow exhaust, alternator, high torque starter and spin-on oil filter.

1961 Triumph TR4

The Triumph TR4 was introduced in 1961 to follow its very successful predecessors, the TR2 and TR3. Code named “Zest” during development, the body was given a more modern and updated appearance by Michelotti, but its drive train and chassis remained the same, using the well-proven 4-cylinder pushrod unit; however, its capacity was increased from 1,991 cc to 2,138 cc.

Handling was improved by a three-inch wider track, and steering was also updated to the more precise rack-and-pinion system. Read More

Five Investments in Cheap Fun

We live in a Golden Age of classic cars. There are so many choices that selecting your first or next classic car has probably never presented as many good options as it does now.
While prices of the blue-chip cars continue to climb to infinity and beyond, we’re also blessed with many good choices at the “affordable” end of the spectrum — what we might call the “white-chip cars.” These are cars that enthusiasts can love, but they won’t make Read More

1960 Triumph TR3A Convertible

A solid original New Mexico car with a recent body-off restoration, this Triumph has the factory rear seat. Factory-quality patch panels were used where needed. Priority was placed on originality and drivability. The chrome has been replated, and the interior was completely re-covered with leather seat trim. The full engine rebuild was performed with 87 mm pistons, enlarging displacement to more than 2.1 liters. Internal engine parts have been balanced, and the transmission was rebuilt. Read More

THE One in a 100

The Austin-Healey 100S is undoubtedly the most prized model of the marque, with prices far exceeding any other model. While Healey prices have risen significantly in the past few years, the 100S remains clearly in the lead.
The 100S was the result of a project undertaken by the Donald Healey Motor Company with financing from Austin. The goal was to develop Austin-Healeys for racing and record-breaking purposes, and though outwardly similar to the 100 and 100M, each 100S was Read More

1954 Austin-Healey 100 Roadster

A 1954 BN1 fitted with the Le Mans kit from new is even rarer than the
“factory” 100M model of 1955

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Following the Austin-Healey 100’s sensational debut at the 1952 Motor Show, the Works entered two mildly modified cars in the 1953 Le Mans 24-Hour race. They finished in 12th and 14th places, a praiseworthy achievement for what were recognizably production sports cars.

Accordingly, the name “Le Mans” was Read More

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