1960 Autobianchi Bianchina Cabriolet

Originally a bicycle manufacturer, and probably best known as a maker of fine racing motorcycles, Edoardo Bianchi built his first automobile in the early 1900s. A wide variety of models followed over the next 30 years, though by 1940 the firm was concentrating on motorcycles and commercial vehicles.

Car manufacture resumed in 1957 under Fiat auspices, Autobianchi’s debut model being the Bianchina, based on Fiat’s new 500. Positioned up market from the Fiat, the Bianchina debuted as the Trasformabile Read More

1956 Jaguar D-type

This gently patinated, tastefully restored 1956 Jaguar D-type sports racing car exemplifies all that was most impressive, most innovative-and perhaps above all most beautiful-about the legendary British manufacturer’s mid-’50s design. The immortal D-type survives today as the supreme example of semi-monocoque frontier technology. After three Le Mans wins in 1955, ’56, and ’57, it was only eliminated by the change to a three-liter engine in 1958.

1940 Lincoln-Zephyr Continental Cabriolet

Without hard evidence of Babe Ruth’s ownership, the extra $300,000 paid for this car represents a giant leap of faith

The Continental is acknowledged as the crowning achievement of Edsel Ford and the head of his design department at Ford, Eugene T. “Bob” Gregorie. Like many great accomplishments, it was the creation of a gifted designer in a single, brilliant moment of insight.

In 1938, Edsel expressed an interest in a Read More

1987 Ferrari Mondial 3.2 Cabriolet

Rear side windows on Cabriolets cost $1,500 to fix, the engine must be removed for major servicing and any electrical glitch is probably serious

When the Ferrari Mondial 8 was introduced at the Geneva Auto Show in March 1980, it was named in honor of the 4-cylinder, 3-liter sports racing Ferrari of the ’60s.
The new Mondial had a 3-liter, 8-cylinder motor mounted transversally behind the driver, as in the 308 Read More

1938 Aston Martin 15/98 Short-Chassis

A pre-war sports car requires more skill and nerve than newer machinery, but the rewards can be enjoyable at speeds just over the legal limit

By the mid-1930s, Aston Martin was one of the most admired British sporting makes. Solidly engineered, low-built,1.5-liter sports-racers took the team prize in the 1934 Tourist Trophy race in Ulster, followed by an impressive third in the 1935 Le Mans 24 hours.

But if the company were Read More

1974-77 Plastic (Not So) Fantastic ‘Vettes

1975 was the nadir. The base motor was down to 165 hp-the lowest since Chevy abandoned the Blue Flame Six in 1955

The 1970s included some great years for the Corvette-Corvette fans still get slightly dizzy at the mention of the L88 and L71 engine options. Unfortunately, those were the other ’70s, the pre-disco, Vietnam-era early ’70s that were really more like a brief encore to the ’60s. The real ’70s, the Read More

1973 BMW 3.0 CSL “Batmobile”

The BMW 3.0 CSL “Batmobile” was one of the most outrageously brutal road-going homologation specials ever conceived, designed to exploit several loopholes and bring to BMW a German Saloon Car Championship. In order to homologate a more competitive racing car, the monocoque was formed from thinner-gauge steel, and aluminum was employed to skin the hood and trunk. An array of luxuries were deleted, such as the front bumper (the rear bumper was now formed of polyester), power steering, electric windows, Read More

1964 Lancia Flaminia 3C 2800 SS

This car needs someone to sort it out and drive it. When these are right, they make superb vintage rally and tour mounts

Vincenzo Lancia loved automobiles, driving and motoring competition. The delectable machines that flowed from the factory were the expression of his passion. There were many great designs pre-War: the Lambda V4 of the vintage years; the Augusta, Lancia’s first small family car; the nimble little Aprilia of the late Read More

1993 Williams-Renault FW15C

ABS brought the realization that it was possible to allow computing power to do far more than keep the wheels from locking

World Champion Alain Prost once described the Williams-Renault FW15C, as “really a little Airbus” -his way of describing an F1 car in the electronic era.

Prost campaigned seven grands prix in the 1993 season, from Germany to Australia. He won the German grand prix where S/N 005 debuted. It Read More

1969 Pontiac Trans Am Ram Air III

If missing the original Ram Air hood and Ram Air air cleaner parts, you are looking at spending $10,000-$15,000 if you can find the right originals

In March of 1969, Pontiac released a little publicized option package, the Trans Am Performance and Appearance Package. Only two ads were published, one in Road and Track and another in Motor Trend. The Trans Am was conceived to campaign in the SCCA’s road racing series. Read More