Iso Rivolta

Renzo Rivolta made a considerable fortune following World War II. He also loved cars. In the early ’60s, he became a victim of the popular musing that begins with, “Let’s marry a sophisticated European chassis and coachwork with a cheap, reliable, and powerful American V8.”
Giotto Bizzarini, father of the 250 SWB and the immortal 250 GTO, left Ferrari at the end of 1961 following a major clash of egos. Giotto met Renzo, and the Iso Rivolta was born. Read More

1991 Ferrari Mondial T Cabriolet

The Ferrari Mondial Cabriolet occupied a unique niche in the luxuxy car market: a four-seat mid-engine Cabriolet with pedigree. The improved Mondial T received a 296-hp, 3405 cc V8 engine mounted longitudinally in the frame. Along with a new engine came a completely new five-speed transmission, electronically controlled variable suspension, and a three-position manual suspension selector. Top speed was 158 mph and the 0 to 100 km/h sprint could be covered in 6.3 seconds.

The French-registered Mondial Read More

1967 Nickey Camaro 427 RS/SS

Today, the words “tuner car” conjures up images of an AMG or Renntech-equipped Mercedes. Or perhaps a Stillen-equipped SUV or a McLaren Mustang. But long before these high-impact, sophisticated cruisers existed, a group of dealer-based “tuners” were turning out supercars of a different sort. Baldwin-Motion, Dana, Nickey and Yenko were all Chevrolet dealers who sold modified bowtie products ready for the dragstrip, thinly disguised as streetable (and thereby finance-able, and in theory, insurable) cars.

When Chevrolet introduced Read More

1970 Fiat Dino 2400 Spider

With a gentle clatter from the fuel pump and distant whir from the starter motor, the orchestral 2.4-liter six pot erupts into life. With a low bass burble below 400 rpm, the big triple twin-choke Webers fluff a little at low revs. Above 5,000, the whine of the cams, thrash of the chains and sucking of the carbs conspire to produce a spine-tingling bellow, building to an ear-piercing crescendo as the rev counter spirals past six grand towards the Read More

1971 Porsche 917/10 Can-Am

Nine seventeen! Two words that spell out the best of the big racing sportscars. Two words that conjure up images of a Pedro Rodriguez Gulf coupe averaging over 160 mph at the formidable Spa-Francorchamps circuit in 1971. Langhecks (longtails), running at over 240 mph down the Mulsanne straight at Le Mans; eleven hundred horsepower unleashed in a bellowing, flame-spitting, turbocharged monster at Laguna Seca in Can-Am. Surely there has never been a more awe-inspiring sports prototype than the Porsche Read More

1929 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Ascot Phaeton

A direct descendant of the Silver Ghost, the Rolls-Royce Phantom I was launched in May 1925. For the most part, the Phantom I chassis was identical to that of its predecessor. It did offer customers two different wheelbase lengths from which to choose: 143.5 inches or 150.5 inches. The Phantom I’s transmission was also the same as before, except that the old cone clutch was replaced with a new, single dry-plate clutch-more conducive to smoother operation.

It didn’t Read More

1972-76 Jensen-Healey

Born out of desperation and existing in chaos, it is surprising that the Jensen-Healey and Jensen GT came into being at all. That today, thirty years later, they can be inexpensive and thoroughly enjoyable cars to own and drive is nothing short of amazing. And yet they are. If the original Lotus engine is in good shape, the body sound, and the suspension has benefited from a few judicious tweaks, the Jensen-Healey roadster is reliable and comfortable for long-distance Read More

1967 Ferrari 330 GTC Coupe

Unveiled at the Geneva Salon in March 1966, the 330 GTC (Gran Tourismo Coupe) allied the 275 GTB chassis with the basic engine from the 330 GT 2+2. Coachwork was a compromise of the 400 Superamerica front blended to the rear tail treatment of the 275 GTS. The new car was a capable performer—fast, quiet, and comfortable.

As it inherited the GTB chassis and its rear transaxle, the 330 GT 2+2 engine block had to be redesigned in Read More

1957 Chevrolet Bel Air Convertible

Capturing the essence of the era’s themes, the ’57 Chevrolet Bel Air represented the pinnacle of ’50s automotive styling. Today, this model remains one of the single most recognized icons of the tall tail fins and excessive chrome age—a time when bigger meant better and there was not a doubt that America built the best cars on the planet.

Under the hood, technology master and horsepower guru Ed Cole worked magic developing Chevy’s small-block V8 engine. The original Read More

1929 Stutz Model M Supercharged Coupe

Stutz’s illustrious history on racetrack and road has become legendary among automotive enthusiasts. By entering a new and untried car in the first Indianapolis 500 race, brilliant engineer Harry C. Stutz, the car’s creator, immediately gained fame for the powerful new marque by placing it eleventh in the contest. For many years afterward, the Stutz would be known and promoted as the “Car That Made Good in a Day.”

Stutz’s racing and sales successes continued through World War Read More