1929 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Ascot Phaeton

A direct descendant of the Silver Ghost, the Rolls-Royce Phantom I was launched in May 1925. For the most part, the Phantom I chassis was identical to that of its predecessor. It did offer customers two different wheelbase lengths from which to choose: 143.5 inches or 150.5 inches. The Phantom I’s transmission was also the same as before, except that the old cone clutch was replaced with a new, single dry-plate clutch-more conducive to smoother operation.

It didn’t Read More

1970 Fiat Dino 2400 Spider

With a gentle clatter from the fuel pump and distant whir from the starter motor, the orchestral 2.4-liter six pot erupts into life. With a low bass burble below 400 rpm, the big triple twin-choke Webers fluff a little at low revs. Above 5,000, the whine of the cams, thrash of the chains and sucking of the carbs conspire to produce a spine-tingling bellow, building to an ear-piercing crescendo as the rev counter spirals past six grand towards the Read More

1971 Porsche 917/10 Can-Am

Nine seventeen! Two words that spell out the best of the big racing sportscars. Two words that conjure up images of a Pedro Rodriguez Gulf coupe averaging over 160 mph at the formidable Spa-Francorchamps circuit in 1971. Langhecks (longtails), running at over 240 mph down the Mulsanne straight at Le Mans; eleven hundred horsepower unleashed in a bellowing, flame-spitting, turbocharged monster at Laguna Seca in Can-Am. Surely there has never been a more awe-inspiring sports prototype than the Porsche Read More

1967 Ferrari 330 GTC Coupe

Unveiled at the Geneva Salon in March 1966, the 330 GTC (Gran Tourismo Coupe) allied the 275 GTB chassis with the basic engine from the 330 GT 2+2. Coachwork was a compromise of the 400 Superamerica front blended to the rear tail treatment of the 275 GTS. The new car was a capable performer—fast, quiet, and comfortable.

As it inherited the GTB chassis and its rear transaxle, the 330 GT 2+2 engine block had to be redesigned in Read More

1972-76 Jensen-Healey

Born out of desperation and existing in chaos, it is surprising that the Jensen-Healey and Jensen GT came into being at all. That today, thirty years later, they can be inexpensive and thoroughly enjoyable cars to own and drive is nothing short of amazing. And yet they are. If the original Lotus engine is in good shape, the body sound, and the suspension has benefited from a few judicious tweaks, the Jensen-Healey roadster is reliable and comfortable for long-distance Read More

1929 Stutz Model M Supercharged Coupe

Stutz’s illustrious history on racetrack and road has become legendary among automotive enthusiasts. By entering a new and untried car in the first Indianapolis 500 race, brilliant engineer Harry C. Stutz, the car’s creator, immediately gained fame for the powerful new marque by placing it eleventh in the contest. For many years afterward, the Stutz would be known and promoted as the “Car That Made Good in a Day.”

Stutz’s racing and sales successes continued through World War Read More

1955 Triumph TR2

In the early 1950s, Jaguar and MG defined the postwar sports car market. The TR2 was Triumph’s attempt to share in the spoils of that market against competitors like the Austin-Healey 100, a slightly faster car that was aggressively courting performance enthusiasts.

There never was a Triumph TR1. The TR2 was developed from the prototype “20 TS” introduced at the Earls Court Motor Show in London in October 1952—the same show that saw the debut of the Healey Read More

1923 Bugatti Type 32 Tank Replica

Vittore Bugatti first entered the Grand Prix arena in 1922 following numerous successes over the previous two years with his 1½-liter 16-valve racing voiturettes. From 1922 to 1925 the regulations imposed a maximum engine capacity of two liters so Bugatti designed a purpose-built straight-eight racing engine which made its debut in a three-car team fitted with cigar-shaped bodies for that year’s French Grand Prix held on July 15, conveniently on roads between Strasbourg and his Molsheim factory. A single Read More

1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing

Rebuilding after World War II, Daimler-Benz was back on line by 1948, producing the basic 170 and 220 series sedans. In 1951 a more technically advanced 300 series was introduced which represented Mercedes-Benz’s return to the luxury market. The 300 featured all-independent suspension, a four-speed manual gearbox and a three-liter in-line six. With the company now more financially sound, Mercedes decided to return to motor sport competition to regain its image around the world.

Engineer Rudolf Uhlenhaut was put in Read More

1953 Ferrari 250 MM Berlinetta

Bodied by Pininfarina in classic Berlinetta style with oval egg-crate grille, brake cooling scoops over the rear wheel arches, hood tie-downs and sliding lightweight plexiglass windows, the powerful, compact and lightweight 250 MMs were ideal competitors for both long-distance races and shorter hillclimb events. In typical Ferrari fashion, the engines had been tuned to give twenty-five or so more horsepower than the MM’s predecessor, the 250S. They now produced a reliable 240 horsepower at
7,200 rpm.

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