1969 Plymouth Road Runner Convertible

Woodward Avenue, Detroit, Michigan, 1968—The Pontiac GTO and the Ford Mustang were about to receive a wake-up call. Adorned with the familiar cartoon decal, Plymouth’s new release took to the streets, ready to explain its creative moniker and unseen capabilities. Plymouth took the outright awesome power of the very expensive GTX, threw in some clever marketing, removed most of the costly trim and high-end standard equipment and created a sure-fire formula for a successful and unbeatable car that became Read More

1974 Maserati Merak

The Maserati Merak, announced at the Paris Salon of 1972, was a little brother to the mid-engined V8 Bora. It used the same Ital Design steel body, but with a smaller V6, 3-liter engine—as found in the Citroën SM coupe—that liberated space for two child-sized rear seats.

The all-alloy powerplant, equipped with triple Weber carburetors, had been built by Maserati for Citroën at the Modena factory, as Citroën had a controlling interest in Maserati during the early Read More

1978–83 Porsche 911SC

Coupe, Targa and Cabriolet

While the automotive world suffered through the 1973-1977 era of dramatically tightened emission-control laws, Porsche was busy building, piece by piece, the better mousetrap that would become the 911SC. Starting with the dramatically simplified CIS fuel injection of the ’73½ 911T, the SC included the flared body of the 1974 Carrera, the engine block from the 3.0-liter Turbo in 1975, the galvanized sheet metal developed in the 1976 cars, and Read More

1959 MGA 1600 Coupe

The A was the car which put MG back on the map. It was pretty, it was contemporary, and it was fun. Top speed was 98 mph and 0 to 60 mph took 15.6 seconds, but raw performance figures are not the reason the MGA became the world’s most popular sports car. The A was an MG in the classic mode; the engineers at Abingdon took standard production parts and combined them in a way that made them special. Read More

1956 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta “TdF”

This Ferrari is one of the diminishing number of highly original, and in many respects “unspoiled” historic cars. As such cars become increasingly rare, that very fact can surely only enhance their value. 0507, still with its original engine, and having been the last thirty-two years in a Dutch museum, is one of the most attractive 250 GT “Tour de France” Ferraris to appear on the auction arena.

1957 Chevrolet Corvette FI Roadster

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America was sadly without a true sports car until Chevrolet introduced the Corvette at the 1953 Motorama show and started production that year. The early Corvettes were lower and sportier than any other domestic car on the market but they lacked the innovative technology necessary to break open the market. Starting in 1955, Corvettes carried a V8 engine which improved their performance but their styling badly needed updating.
In order for Chevy to combat the T-Bird Read More

1973 Porsche Carrera RSR 2.8

n the early 1970s, the FIA decided sports car racing should use cars that more closely resembled production vehicles. Using the Carrera RS 2.7 as its homologation platform, the 2.8 RSR developed 300 (DIN) hp with the use of a twin-plug ignition, hotter camshafts, higher compression pistons, and many other enhancements.
The car offered here was sold to Bob Hagestad of Denver who used it to take part in IMSA and Trans-Am races including: Road Atlanta Trans-Am, April Read More

1961 Abarth Simca 1300 S1

Most people associate Abarth with Fiat, but a very successful liaison was also formed with Simca. The French company was partly owned by Fiat, and when they wanted to appeal to a younger market with a more sporting image, they turned to the Italian giant for help. Fiat in turn went to Abarth, who received sponsorship from the larger company. A deal was struck whereby Simca shipped floorpans of their 1000 Sabour to Abarth, who then cut 4″ out Read More

1968 Aston Martin DB6 Volante

Launched in 1965, the DB6 replaced the DB5 and for the first time the title “Volante” was introduced to denote the convertible model of the Aston Martin motor cars, a tradition continuing to this day.
Though recognizably related to its Touring-styled DB4 ancestor, the wheelbase was now longer than before, resulting in an extensive re-style with more raked windscreen, raised roofline and reshaped rear quarter windows. Opening front quarter lights made a reappearance, but the major change was Read More

1965 Mustang Convertible

Wilson Pickett caught the mood of the nation when, in his blues song, Mustang Sally, he sang “I bought you a brand new Mustang ’bout nineteen sixty-five.” Sally’s was only one of the 680,000 Mustangs that were sold in 1964-65 as the car that Lee Iococca and his committee of eight designed wildly exceeded sales projections.
The Mustang was introduced in March of 1964 and those built up to August of that year are often referred to as “’64½s” Read More