1969 Renault Alpine A110

Presented at the Paris Auto Show in 1963, Jean Redele unveiled the Alpine A110 after his prior successes with the A106 and A108. The A110 was a true departure for the company as styling was largely revised and the Dieppe-based firm began building one of their more respected models that would remain in limited production for over a decade.

The A110 was equipped with various powerplants throughout its production. In the 15 years, only 7,812 examples were built, including Read More

1971 Mercedes-Benz 280SE 3.5 Coupe

The 280SE 3.5-liter cars were Mercedes-Benz’s first V8-powered sports cars. A combination of elegant styling coupled with effortless performance made them highly desirable and they were every bit as prestigious as their competitors. From the outset, the emphasis was on quality and the cars featured a new interior with more wood and leather upholstery as the standard. The 3.5-liter V8 engine was highly advanced, with electronic fuel injection and transistor ignition. It marked a turning point in Mercedes-Benz engine Read More

1979-85 Mazda RX-7

In 1979 Mazda jumped into the two-seat sports car market with the basic, no-frills, rotary-powered RX-7. The car was an instant winner, and Road & Track referred to it as “a major breakthrough for the enthusiast.” Its primary competition, the once lean and mean Datsun 240Z of the early ’70s, had become the 280ZX, an overweight boulevard cruiser.

Mazda had been using the Wankel rotary engine in its cars since the late 60s, but problems with poor fuel economy and Read More

1966 Shelby GT350 H

The Mustang was the first of the pony cars and the most charismatic. When equipped with a high-performance, 289-cubic-inch, 271-horsepower engine, they became favorites at the stoplight drags.

However, once sports-car maestro Carroll Shelby got his hands on the Mustang, they entered a different league. With subtle but critical modifications to the chassis and engine, the GT350 went on to trounce Jaguar E-types on the track and became B-production National Champions in SCCA racing. Top speed was around 120 Read More

1959 AC Ace “Cobra” Roadster

The success of Cliff Davis’s successful Tojeiro sports-racer prompted AC Cars to put the design into production in 1954 as the Ace. The Davis car’s pretty Ferrari 166-inspired Barchetta bodywork was retained, as was John Tojeiro’s twin-tube ladder-frame chassis and Cooper-influenced all-independent suspension, but the power unit was AC’s own venerable two-liter long-stroke six.

This overhead-camshaft engine originated in 1919 and, with a modest 80 bhp (later 100 bhp) on tap, endowed the Ace with respectable, if not outstanding, performance. Read More

1989 Lamborghini Countach Anniversary

The Countach debuted at the Geneva Auto Salon as a show car in 1971 and was introduced to the European market in 1974. In polite terms, the name Countach is Italian slang for “Good Lord!” or simply, “Wow!” This exclamation aptly describes most car lovers’ response on seeing the car for the first time. Wildly futuristic in the ’70s, the Countach was the work of Marcello Gandini at the Carrozzeria Nuccio Bertone.

First introduced as an LP 400, the Read More

1967 Mercedes-Benz 230SL Roadster

The 230SL, along with its later variants, the 250SL and 280SL, comprise the third generation of the Super Leicht (“super light”) models that began with the 300SL in the 1950s. This new model introduced in 1963 at the Geneva Motor Show was an immediate hit, doubling the sales rate for even the best year of the 190SL. The styling of the 230SL set design directions for many modern Grand Touring cars. Even today the lines look crisp.

Although intended Read More

1951 Ferrari 340 America Berlinetta

Ferrari S/N 0148A is part of a very aristocratic lineage of Ferraris, as it is equipped with the famous Lampredi V12, which would go on to contribute to Ferrari’s first victories in F1 in its 375 F1 version. In the 340 version, the 4101-cc engine develops 260 hp at 6500 rpm. It was a legendary motor that was several steps above the standard 250 production unit and went on to spawn its elder siblings, the 375 MM and 410 Sport, Read More

1973-74 Volkswagen Type 181 Thing

After the success of the Volkswagen Beetle in the 1960s, VW resurrected the idea of an on- and off-road car, and called it the Type 181 “Thing.” Inspired by the WWII Type 82 Kübelwagen, the Thing was updated with the Beetle baseline engine and running gear, but with the beefier Transporter/Microbus suspension. Also along the lines of the Kübelwagen was its Dumpsteresque-yet practical-styling. The simple doors and standard soft top could easily be removed, and the windshield folded flat. Read More

1953 Buick Roadmaster Woody

Buick marked their 50th anniversary in 1953. With V8 engines gaining popularity, it was quite natural that Buick would celebrate its golden anniversary by introducing a modern overhead-valve V8. Remarkably, in addition to the first Buick V8 engine and the first use of a 12-volt electrical system, the 1953 Buick Estate Wagon was the very last woody station wagon offered by an American automobile manufacturer. These factors, combined with Buick’s beautiful styling, make this one of the most desirable Read More