1958 Austin-Healey 100-6

It was with an Austin-Healey 100-Six in basic production trim that Tommy Wisdom and Cecil Winby won their class in the 1957 Mille Miglia, while three factory entered 100-Sixes went on to take the Manufacturers’ Team Prize at the 1958 Sebring 12 Hour race. The same year saw the first factory rally team of 100-Sixes show real potential, including Pat Moss, sister of Stirling, taking her first Coupe de Dames for a penalty-free run. Shortly afterwards, the first lady Read More

1962-80 MGB Roadster

The very large production numbers and strong aftermarket parts support make the MGB a superb entry-level, low-stress sports car. It was built in the days when cars still had ignition points and grease fittings; any reasonably deft enthusiast with a copy of the factory manual can maintain one of these cars.
MGBs come in four main groups: those with three main bearing engines built from ’62 to ’64, those with five main bearings (’65 to ’69), emission-controlled cars Read More

1935 Mercedes-Benz 500K Drophead Coupe

The merger of Daimler and Benz in the mid 1920s came at a time of acute difficulty for the German motor industry. Competition success such as Rudolf Caracciola’s 1930 European Hillclimb Championship in a supercharged SSK helped sales, which had risen to 6,000 in 1932 from a workforce reduced to 9,000 by the virtual closure of the Benz factories. The addition of smaller cars as commercial vehicles saw output rise to 25,000 in 1935, of which a mere 190 Read More

1963 Ferrari 250GT Berlinetta Lusso

Arguably the most beautiful product ever to carry the Maranello marque’s prancing horse emblem, the Ferrari 250GT Lusso Berlinetta debuted at the Paris Salon in October 1962. Styled by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, the Lusso (luxury) combined race-track looks with new standards of passenger comfort. Beautifully proportioned, the new 250GT blended a low-slung nose with sculpted Kamm tail by means of some of the most exquisite lines yet seen on an automobile. Slim pillars and wide expanses of Read More

1970 Lamborghini Espada SII

After first the Miura, then the Marzal, Lamborghini once again stole the Geneva show in 1968 with the Espada, styled by Marcello Gandini, the genius who heads Bertone’s design studio.

Despite its incredible styling the car was comparatively conventional, incorporating a pressed steel semi-monocoque built by Marchesi in Modena, into the front of which was placed the 4-liter quad-camshaft V12 engine from the 400GT, mated to a 5-speed gearbox. 320 horsepower Read More

1969 Chevrolet Camaro RS/SS Convertible Pace Car

Desirable to collectors, this Indianapolis 500 Pace Car replica Camaro is, like the original, an RS/SS convertible. As is usually the custom with Indy 500 pace cars, 100 examples were built for use by press and dignitaries during 500 Month at the Speedway. A further 3,674 Camaros equipped with the Pace Car were later marketed to the general public. This car is one of those 3,674.

The 1969 Camaro was the last year of the original Camaro package Read More

1938 Jaguar SS100 Roadster

In the early ’30s, William Lyons’ design influence began to take its full effect. The Swallow Sidecar Company evolved into Swallow Coachworks with a highly successful line of Lyons-designed bodies, mostly for the Austin Seven and 6-cylinder Wolseley-Hornet. Swallow’s first complete car, the SS-I, based on the Standard (later to become Standard-Triumph) Sixteen (2-liter) and Twenty (2.5-liter) chassis, was introduced in 1931, followed by the SS-II on the Standard Little Nine (1-liter).

SS cars offered value, performance and, Read More

1953 Mercedes-Benz 300S

Originally introduced in 1951 at the Frankfurt Show, the Mercedes-Benz 300 range was very much a flagship designed to promote the Stuttgart manufacturer as a producer of the finest luxury cars; a design it undoubtedly achieved, ultimately offering imposing and elegant six seater coachwork, in either closed or open form, allied to a smooth and powerful engine, fine road manners and cockpit-adjustable ride height.

Using a separate tubular cruciform chassis, the 300 boasted independent coil spring suspension Read More

1960 Ferrari 250 GT PF Coupe

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By the time the 250 PF Coupe arrived in 1959, Ferrari had refined its road models and, every year, the 250 improved as a practical car. It retained, however, the sporting heritage and the broad outline of the sports racing cars from which it derived. The 250 PF was not a cousin to the 250 Testa Rossa; it was its sister.

The 250 GT chassis was the model on which the leading Italian coachbuilders competed for Ferrari’s Read More

1972 Lancia Stratos Rally

The introduction of the Lancia Stratos represented a new high point in Lancia’s already illustrious competition history and showed the world a new concept in rally car design, winning three World Rally Championships between 1974 and 1976. The story of Stratos goes back to the 1970 Turin motor show where Bertone, the Italian coachbuilder, exhibited a futuristic wedge-shaped concept car with a mid-engined Fulvia 1600 HF called the Stratos – after an employee suggested this new car looked as Read More