1938 Bugatti Type 57C Special Coupe

With so many spectacular Bugattis, it takes a special car to stand out. It’s safe to say that this one-of-a-kind Type 57C Special coupe is one of the most intriguing Bugattis ever constructed.

In June 1938, this car was built at the Bugatti factory in Molsheim. The frame, no. 278, was equipped with a blown Type 57 engine, 4-speed gearbox and rear end, all numbered 486. This car was originally issued chassis no. 57335, a number from an earlier Bugatti Read More

1965 Shelby Cobra Daytona Coupe

In 1963, Shelby’s new Cobra had established its supremacy on the short road courses of America, but Shelby and Ford shared a more ambitious goal-to beat Ferrari to the Federation Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA) World Manufacturer’s Championship for GT cars.

After victories at Le Mans and Goodwood, Shelby narrowly missed the 1964 championship, vowing to return next year. In February 1965, Shelby entered four coupes at Daytona, among them CSX2601, which retired with a blown engine after eight hours.

Another Read More

1949 Talbot-Lago T26 Grand Prix

What this is about is the pre-war Grand Prix experience in an attainable, moderately bomb-proof and reliable package

The Talbot-Lago T26 Grand Prix took its double barreled name from an ex-military major who in France was known as Antoine, in England as Tony, but in his native Venice, Italy, had been christened Antonio Lago. Major Tony Lago had spent most of his professional life in the motor industry. In the 1920s he Read More

When X1/9 Marked the Spot

By the early 1970s, some were predicting the demise of the inexpensive sports car. Modern small sedans like the Audi Fox and VW Rabbit were threatening to render sports cars redundant. It didn’t help that the standard-bearers for the under-$4,000 sports car class were the MG Midget and Triumph Spitfire.

Both were ancient in comparison to up-to-the-minute designs like the Rabbit and Fox, or for that matter, the Toyota Celica. The enthusiast publications practically demanded that somebody build a cheap Read More

1951 Porsche 356 Split-Window Coupe

This car is fitted with the rare 1,500-cc engine, when most were 1,100 cc to 1,300 cc. I don’t know if it’s the actual engine from new, but it is correct

During the Second World War, Ferdinand “Ferry” Porsche and a handful of his faithful employees started work on development number 356 in their workshops in the town of Gmünd in Kärnten, Austria. The first design drawings were completed on July 17, Read More

1924 Bentley 3 Liter Red Label

Any slowdown in Vintage Bentley values due to the current economic climate is likely to push owners toward a cup of tea rather than Valium

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Chassis 356 was the first “Red Label” Bentley produced, and it was this model that was to lay the foundations of Bentley’s financial success. The final specification of the first Red Label, short chassis, Speed Model (generally known in the works as “Speed One”) was Read More

1990 Ferrari 348 tb

The 348 has good performance, is fun to drive, comfortable, and has eye-catching styling. The service issues have proven to be more myth than reality

The Ferrari 348 had the unenviable task of following up Maranello’s best-selling 308/328 duo. A truly innovative design, it was the first Ferrari to be based on a robot-welded monocoque. Cradled by a separate subframe, its quad-cam, 32-valve, 3,405-cc V8 was longitudinally mounted with a transverse gearbox. Read More

1970 Lamborghini Miura P400S

The price may have looked high for the U.K., but it equates to about 400k
euros. It would be hard to find a nicer LHD car in Europe for the same money

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“But step back for a minute and work out what makes the Miura so special. In 1966 there was nothing like it. Only racing cars and the obscure little French Bonnet/Matra Djet had mid-mounted engines. Ferrari’s road-going Read More

1936 Lincoln Model K “Howard Hughes” Boattail Speedster

This Lincoln Model K speedster started out as Howard Hughes’s personal 1936 Lincoln K model V12 Limousine, until he converted the car into his idea of a Boattail Speedster.

It was originally shipped to Long Beach, California, in January of 1936 and apparently special ordered with only one foot rest in the rear. Other documents indicate the car was customized by the Hughes Aircraft Company shortly thereafter in Culver City, California. It was restored in Spring 2009.

1922 Sunbeam 2-Liter Grand Prix

An 87-year-old car is like an older person; you certainly don’t expect them to run and jump with the young folks, but they can be fascinating to be around

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For 1922 and the following three seasons, the Automobile Club of France elected to limit engine capacity to two liters for cars competing in Grand Prix events. The 1922 race was to take place west of Strasbourg on a triangular course. Read More

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