1935 Packard Twelve Sport Coupe

Packard’s most beautiful automobiles of the 1930s were arguably produced as part of the Eleventh Series, and they boasted the first gentle hints of streamlining, such as a slightly angled radiator shell, more deeply skirted fenders, and vee’d headlamp lenses. The 12-cylinder models of this series were the ultimate Packards, and the ultimate of the ultimate were the versions designed by Alexis de Sakhnoffsky and built by LeBaron of Detroit. These scarce cars featured the latest in aerodynamics, including separate, Read More

1959 Jaguar XK 150S 3.4 Roadster

The final glorious incarnation of Jaguar’s fabulous XK series of sports cars arrived in 1957. The XK 150 was a progressive development of the XK 120 and XK 140, retaining the same basic chassis, 3.4-liter engine and 4-speed Moss transmission of its predecessors while benefiting from a new, wider body that provided increased interior space and improved visibility — courtesy of a single-piece wrap-around windscreen that replaced the XK 140’s divided screen.

Cleverly, the new body used many XK 120/140 Read More

1955 Frazer Nash Le Mans Coupe

Introduced in 1953, complementing the company’s successful open sports cars, the Le Mans coupe was the first closed Frazer Nash to enter production. It used the new parallel-tube-chassis frame, around which was wrapped a beautiful, full-width alloy body that, with its curvaceous lines and horizontal front grille, hinted at the forthcoming Sebring roadster.

The chassis boasted independent front suspension, rack-and-pinion steering, torsion-bar rear suspension and twin-leading-shoe brakes, while the engine was, of course, the 1,971-cc, 6-cylinder Bristol. Of the nine Read More

A Mercedes for the Farm, Woods or Battlefield

In the United States, Mercedes-Benz Unimogs are rare enough to qualify as mild curiosities, but these tough, fear-no-road trucks are also inching up on the cool meter, especially with military-vehicle buffs.

You’ll see them scattered around the countryside — often in the mountain areas of the western United States — but few know their long, fascinating history.

For example, Unimogs were originally designed as farm vehicles. Let’s jump into the Wayback Machine for a little Unimog history.

Out of the Read More

1981 Renault 5 Turbo

The Renault 5 Turbo is a hatchback with a high-performance engine. This French car debuted at the Brussels Motor Show in January of 1980. At this time, rally cars were climbing in popularity. The design of this car was tailored towards the rally car market, but a street version also was sold. During its four-year production run, fewer than 4,000 of these high-performance cars were manufactured.

The Renault 5 Turbo should not be confused with the Alpine Turbo or GT Read More

1955 Jaguar D-Type

When the Jaguar D-type debuted at the 1954 24 Hours of Le Mans, it finished a narrow 2nd to a 4.9-liter Ferrari V12. A year later, a D-type with a long-nosed factory body and a revised motor won the race outright.

Although Jaguar retired from racing after the 1956 season, the D-type continued to flourish in private hands, winning Le Mans in 1956 and 1957 for the Ecurie Ecosse. Although not necessarily well suited to every type of course, the Read More

1940 Oldsmobile Dynamic Series 70 Woodie Wagon

In 1941, the station wagon body was only offered by Oldsmobile on the bottom-of-the-line Special 60 Series. Sharing its wheelbase and dimensions with the Chevrolet Special Deluxe Wagon, it offered the brand engineering for which GM was famous.

As was the standard practice then, coachbuilding for special models such as the labor-intensive wagons was contracted out to outside body companies. One such company was Mid-State Body Company in Waterloo, NY, which had been building custom commercial bodies, including special wagons, Read More

Mercedes’ Little Road Rocket

Most motoring enthusiasts are aware of the Mercedes-Benz 190E 2.3 16-valve cars. These models have acquired several nicknames, such as “Cosworth” or its diminutive “Cossie.” Although they have become famous, good examples remain elusive. But these are tough little cars, and refurbishing a driver is affordable, so you don’t have to “buy the best.”

These cars only came in Smoke Silver and Pearl Black. Powered by the Mercedes M102 4-cylinder engines, U.S.-market Cossies made 167 horsepower and European versions made Read More

1953 Porsche 356 Pre-A Reutter Cabriolet

  •  Rare pre-A model; coachwork by Reutter
  • One of 394 built in 1953
  • Matching numbers
  • Comprehensive restoration
  • Correct Ivory exterior and red leather interior
  • Black convertible top
  • Owner’s manual
  • Kardex and Porsche Certificate of Authenticity

Number 60266 is confirmed by the included Porsche Certificate of Authenticity and Kardex as a USA-spec, pre-A 1500. It has been restored in the original R504 Ivory exterior, over a red leather interior with black convertible top.

2007 Ferrari 599 GTB Fiorano

The 599 GTB Fiorano was a ground-breaking achievement for Ferrari. Although it was touted as a dual-purpose grand touring and sports car, the 599 could easily outmatch the performance of Ferrari’s iconic F40.

The 599’s engine was derived directly from the Ferrari Enzo supercar. The 6-liter V12 produced 620 brake horsepower at 7,600 rpm, sprinting the car from 0 to 60 mph in 3.7 seconds and on to a top speed of 205 mph.

Like all modern Ferraris, the 599 Read More