1967-72 Fiat Dino Spider

In theory, the marriage of a Ferrari drive-train with an inexpensive Fiat body should have resulted in an affordable sports car with sparkling performance. Over the years, though, the initial promise of the Fiat Dino has simply not been kept. The Ferrari engine has proven expensive to maintain and the Fiat bodies have disintegrated.
By now, most Fiat Dino Spiders have been through the same wringer, or cycle, that 246 Dinos went through. In the late ’70s and early Read More

1974 Ferrari Dino 246 GTS “Dino”

Left-hand drive chassis number 06470 was delivered new to main agents Tayre Ferrari in Madrid in October 1974 and sold to an American citizen, William Kemmerer, its first owner. The latter was then serving with the USAF and brought the Dino back to the US from Spain when his tour of duty was completed. Ferrari Market Letter records that the car was serviced by Algar Ferrari in Philadelphia in the late 1970s and early 1980s.

The Motorcar Gallery of Fort Read More

1991 Lotus Elan

Should the Harvard Business School need yet another case study in how a great idea can go counter-clockwise down a toilet if not executed properly, please have them refer to the launch/introduction/sale of the 1991 Lotus Elan Turbo SE in the US.
Introduced during the same twelve-month period as the Miata, Geo Metro convertible and Capri droptop, the Elan was simply ignored by the American public. It was just another small sports car (with the Isuzu name staring Read More

BMW 2002

Light steering, reasonable acceleration and braking, a delightful gearbox and above-average build quality have led the BMW 2002 to cult car status. With its cohorts, the Austin Mini-Cooper and the Lotus Cortina, these classic cars reinvented the simple box as automotive performance art. In BMW’s case, the 2002 probably saved this now Bavarian powerhouse from automotive extinction. As David E. Davis wrote in April of 1968, “To my way of thinking, the 2002 is one of modern civilization’s all-time Read More

1983-87 Lotus Esprit

Limited volume manufacturers such as Lotus occasionally have monumental turning points. The introduction of the Turbo Esprit in 1983 suddenly provided Lotus enthusiasts with the opportunity to drive a car that was faster than a scalded cat, still had the proverbial glued-to-the-road Lotus handling and was actually reliable.
For $47,984 you could own a car with the ability to sprint from 0-60 in 6.6 seconds, its 2.2-litre, 4 cylinder, dohc and twin Dell’Orto-carbed motor producing 210 bbp. The Bosch Read More