1931 Alfa Romeo 6C-1750

The 6C series had been founded as early as 1924 when Alfa Romeo engineer Vittorio Jano, perhaps the greatest automotive engineer of his era, was detailed “to develop a medium capacity light car with brilliant performance.” The great engineer chose the balance and pick-up characteristics of an in-line six cylinder engine and combined them with what was, by the standards of the time, a very lightweight and nimble-handling chassis design. Much experience gained in development of his AIACR World Read More

1953 Ferrari 625TF Barchetta

The designation Ferrari 625 usually conjures up visions of the four-cylinder 2 1/2-liter Grand Prix car designed in 1951, the number 625 indicating the capacity of one cylinder. The victorious 12-cylinder Formula 1 and Formula 2 cars had by then begun to lose their competitive edge and Lampredi had joined Ferrari as Chief Engineer to replace Colombo who deserted to Maserati.

It was Lampredi’s conviction that a four-cylinder engine would not only be lighter, but also more efficient and Read More

1932 NAG Type 219 Sport Kabriolet

The Nationale Automobile-Gesellschaft (NAG) was formed from earlier motorcar and electrical manufacturing concerns in Berlin in 1915 and survived until the 1930s. It was then absorbed by a group which is still in existence today. The constituent companies had produced many different models of cars (at least one of which was used by the Kaiser) including electric powered versions and numerous commercial vehicles, mostly buses.

The 4 1/2-liter V8 NAG appeared in 1931. It was the first V8 motorcar Read More

1953 Fiat 8V Fixed Head Coupe

Fiat is one of Italy’s oldest and greatest car manufacturers and, although remarkably successful in early motor racing, has made surprisingly few real sports cars. The Turin firm won the French Grand Prix in 1907 and again in 1922 when Nazzaro won the race at 79.10 mph in a two-liter Fiat. Yet the first notable sports car to emerge was, arguably, the 1934 Fiat 508 “Balilla,” following several class wins by various Fiats in the Mille Miglias of the Read More

1960 Aston Martin DB4 Series 2

Intended for the affluent connoisseur, the Aston Martin DB4 made its debut at the 1958 London Show. With its hand-crafted aluminum body and high-output six-cylinder engine, it was a logical development of its DB2 and DB MkIII predecessors.

Aston went to Carrozzeria Touring, the great Italian styling house, to interpret their thoughts for their new shape. Using their famous Superleggera – superlight – tubular structure, Touring created an aesthetic classic, light in appearance and construction alike.

Underneath was Aston Read More

1966 Ferrari 275 GTS

By 1964, the Ferrari production car line had been divided into four modes: 500 Superfast, 330 GT 2+2, 275 GTB and the 275 GTS, a Spyder built atop the GTB chassis but with an entirely different body design by Pininfarina.

Similar in appearance to the 330 GT 2+2 coupe, the styling of the 275 GTS was more conservative than that of the 275 GTB Berlinetta. The GTS actually looked like a luxury Read More

1927 Bugatti Type 35B Grand Prix

Considered by many people to be the most beautiful racing car of its period, and an enduring classic design of all time, the Type 35 Bugatti is also one of the most successful racing cars ever built, with a string of major victories in the hands of famous

In the late 1920s it was also the best car that could be purchased by an amateur racing driver and at the same time Read More

1970 Jaguar Series II XKE Roadster

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To some the Series II E-type represents the best of all worlds. The classic styling and design is unmistakable and recognized as one of the finest roadsters ever built with added design advantages over its Series I predecessor.

These include a new cross-flow radiator with twin electric fans for better engine cooling, bigger Girling-made brakes, collapsible steering column, stronger chrome-plated wire wheels, better clutch with higher-rated diaphragm spring and new camshafts with redesigned profiles to give quieter Read More

1959 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Veloce

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The economic depression that followed World War II decreed that Alfa Romeo could no longer afford to produce purely the bespoke motorcars that had made the marque famous on both road and track. One of the first results of this change of direction was the Bertone-designed Giulietta of 1954, a small and graceful two-door coupe. Under the steel skin of the 750 Series Giulietta the chassis employed independent front suspension with a coil-sprung live axle at the Read More

1991 Ferrari F40

Introduced in Europe in 1987, Ferrari’s newest supercar was a shock to the senses. An engineering tour-de-force, the F40 combined raw-edged radical styling with state-of-the-art engine, body and chassis design.

Driving one is a visceral experience, hammering the senses with brutal acceleration, go-kart-quick reflexes and a howling exhaust note that pierces your very being. The experience is addictive, a powerful narcotic for the soul of a driver.

More than anything, it’s the car’s purpose that underlines the experience. Few Read More